Backyard Theatre's 'Disco Pigs'

Backyard Theatre brings the drama 'Disco Pigs' to Limber Tree Yoga Studio for a three-show run starting Friday, Nov. 10. The production features Mia Anderson and Kievan McCave. 

JACI WEBB/Gazette Staff

Theater performed in a yoga studio?

For Backyard Theatre founder Amanda McCave, producing a play in an unusual space is part of her mission because it brings theater to the people. She turned her own backyard into a theater four years ago when she founded the company and when winter hits, she looks for indoor spaces. One of her favorites is Limber Tree Yoga Studio.

“Disco Pigs” opens at Limber Tree Yoga Studio at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 10. It will also be performed on Saturday, Nov. 11, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 12, at 6 p.m. Admission is pay what you can.

“I love this space,” McCave said at the start of rehearsal Monday night.

The studio is cozy and softly lit. Just know there are a dozen silk cocoons hanging from the ceiling that are used for aerial yoga. They add a surreal feel, but also bring balance to the frantic pace of the production.

“Disco Pigs” features Kievan McCave and Mia Anderson as Pig and Runt, buddies who were born just seconds apart in the same hospital in the town of Cork, Ireland. They are so close, they invent their own language and a world that blurs the lines between real and make-believe.

"We made a world where no one can live in 'sept us two, like Bonnie & Clyde. You've seen that movie, no?" Runt asks Pig.

On their 17th birthday, fueled by disco music and cheap booze, they spin out of control.

Written by Enda Walsh, “Disco Pigs” made its debut in 1997, winning awards at the Edinburgh Festival and eventually being turned into a film.

The 90-minute show is so intense that McCave opted not to add an intermission. Kievan, a junior at West High, said the emotional and physical demands of the show are greater than those of his previous shows. His character unravels mentally and turns violent over the course of the play.

“Becoming Pig is like singing or playing an instrument, you learn to play that note,” Kievan said.

Anderson, who graduated from high school three years ago, said the show is about finding yourself and your direction in life.

“When you grow up, it doesn’t always turn out the way you want it to,” Anderson said.

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Entertainment Reporter

Jaci Webb covers entertainment for The Billings Gazette.