College of Technology to officially become City College at MSU Billings

2012-10-21T23:00:00Z 2012-10-22T13:38:03Z College of Technology to officially become City College at MSU BillingsBy MARY PICKETT mpickett@billingsgazette.com The Billings Gazette

Goodbye, College of Technology.

Hello, City College.

Montana State University Billings College of Technology officially will change its name to City College at Montana State University Billings on Wednesday.

The ceremony unveiling signs with the new name will begin at 11 a.m. at the campus, 3803 Central Ave.

“I invite the community to be part of this historic and important event that makes higher education a reality for everyone,” said City College Dean Marsha Riley.

Visitors also can tour the campus and learn more about its programs at an open house from 3 to 7 p.m.

Much of the transformation to the new name already has taken place. Callers to the campus hear a “City College” greeting. Its website — found at citycollege.msubillings.edu — has a City College logo.

Local residents also now recognize the new name when they meet Riley.

The West End campus has undergone more than a name change in the past few years.

The Montana Board of Regents earlier this year voted new names for the state’s five colleges of technology to reflect their transformation into comprehensive two-year colleges.

Two-year programs in Bozeman and Hamilton also received new names.

“College of Technology” dates from a time when the schools were vocational-technical programs.

City College still offers technical degrees in automotive technology, diesel, welding and drafting, but has expanded to include degrees in health, fire science and business, as well as a general studies program for those wishing to transfer to four-year campuses.

Many classes and several degrees can be taken all online.

While the college continues to recruit recent graduates of high schools in the area, it hopes to attract more nontraditional learners as well, Riley said.

This fall, City College added 11 new evening classes, including welding courses, designed for people who work full time and want to start or restart a college education.

Night classes will continue this spring and include an introduction to computers course.

Riley also is working with local employers to develop customized, noncredit training programs for their employees.

The classes are part of the College!Now project funded through the Lumina Foundation to get more Montanans into two-year education.

City College’s front desk and student services stay open until 6 p.m. on Tuesdays to accommodate evening students. A student health office opens about four hours a day.

Parmly Billings Library also has a branch library at City College, which stays open to 6 p.m., Monday through Thursday.

Riley hopes to start a speaker series open to the community in the near future.

This fall, 1,336 students enrolled at City College, which is down about 4 percent from last year.

A slight drop in enrollment was expected because the college graduated its largest class on record in the spring and a good job market may draw potential students into jobs, she said.

Copyright 2014 The Billings Gazette. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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