State to honor Western Heritage Center, 6 others with humanities awards

2000-12-25T23:00:00Z State to honor Western Heritage Center, 6 others with humanities awardsThe Associated Press The Associated Press
December 25, 2000 11:00 pm  • 

The Montana Committee for the Humanities has named the Western Heritage Center and six other honorees to receive 2001 Montana Governor’s Humanities Awards.

Established by Gov. Marc Racicot in 1995, the awards honor scholarship and service that enhance public under -standing and appreciation of the humanities.

The recipients will be honored dur ing a ceremony with the new governor, Judy Martz, on Feb. 8, 2001, in Helena’s Capitol Rotunda.

The winners are:

The Western Heritage Center. Housed in the former Parmly Billings Library building in downtown Billings, the center is a regional museum that interprets and reflects life in the Yellowstone River Valley.

The center cares for a collection of more than 16,000 artifacts that provide a tangible record of the region’s past, and the museum offers a large array of publications and programs. They include the Montana Committee for the Humanities- and National Endowment for the Humanities-sponsored “Our Place in the West” and a major new program titled “Living Hard in Modern Times: Discoveries, Traditions and Transformations in the Yellowstone River Region.”

The Western Heritage Center has been a national model of museum out -reach and service regionwide.

Greg Keeler, a professor at Montana State University-Bozeman since 1975. Keeler is widely recognized as a social commentator, poet, song -writer, essayist and playwright.

Keeler has written seven volumes of poetry – most recently “Sea Widow’s Journal: To a Fisherman Drowned” – as well as many plays, songs and essays.

Henrietta Mann, a professor and director of Native American studies pro -grams in Montana for nearly 30 years. She recently was named to the first endowed chair of Native American studies at MSU-Bozeman.

In addition to her years of service in Montana and long publication record, she has spoken on Native American issues nationally and held positions with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Association on American Indian Affairs.

Harriet Meloy of Helena, a con tributor to Montana humanities for many years. Meloy served as a member and chair of the state Board of Public Instruction and has worked for decades with the Montana Historical Society, the American Association of University Women, the League of Women Voters, the School for the Deaf and Blind, Growing Friends of Helena, the Elkhorn’s Citizens Organization and Plan Helena.

Lee Rostad of Martinsdale, a longtime cultural leader, citizen scholar and activist in Montana. She is a gover -nor’s appointee to the Montana Historical Society and MCH board and has written three books, including “Honey Wine and Hunger Root,” a biography of Grace Stone Coates, a biography of Charles Bair and a variety of articles on Montana history.

Rostad also has found time to help run a ranch and play a leadership role in the Charles Bair Family Trust and the establishment of the Alberta Bair Museum.

Helen “Gus” Miller, a Butte-based driving force in Montana’s cultural affairs. She chaired the Montana Repertory Theatre’s statewide advisory board for more than a decade, has been a Museum of the Rockies trustee for the past eight years, sits on the UM School of Fine Arts’ advisory council and is a member of Media Arts.

Paul Lauren, founding director of and Mansfield professor of ethics and public affairs at The University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center.

Lauren has addressed audiences and consulted with governments on human rights all over the world. His most recent book, “The Evolution of International Human Rights: Visions Seen,” was nomi nated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1999.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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