Key votes of Tester, Rehberg

2012-03-04T00:00:00Z Key votes of Tester, RehbergBy MIKE DENNISON Gazette State Bureau The Billings Gazette
March 04, 2012 12:00 am  • 

HELENA — From the federal budget to health care reform to gays in the military, Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., and Rep. Denny Rehberg, R-Mont., have voted on many of the same key issues of the times.

Below is a sampling of some of those votes since both men have been in Congress, from 2007-2011:

2011, with Barack Obama as president:

Extending the payroll-tax cut: Tester voted YES last December on the temporary two-month extension, while Rehberg joined fellow House Republicans in voting NO to reject the deal — but the GOP later relented and agreed.

Free-trade agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea: Passed the House and Senate and became law. Rehberg voted YES; Tester voted NO.

Budget compromise to raise federal debt ceiling and cut spending in 2013, if supercommittee failed to reach agreement: Passed House and Senate and became law. Rehberg voted NO; Tester voted YES.

Extend some provisions of anti-terrorism PATRIOT Act four years: Passed the House and Senate and became law, over the objections of civil libertarians. Rehberg and Tester both voted NO.

Republican House budget resolution that cut spending, cut taxes for the wealthy and corporations, and converted Medicare to voucher system: Passed the House but stalled in the Senate. Rehberg and Tester both voted NO.

2010 (Obama):

Overhaul regulation of Wall Street and financial services industry: Passed the House and Senate and became law. Rehberg voted NO, Tester voted YES.

Require broader disclosure of campaign spending by third-party groups: Passed the House but killed by Republican filibuster in the Senate. Rehberg voted NO on the bill; Tester voted to break the filibuster on behalf of the bill.

Allow repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell” law banning openly gay members of the military: Passed the House and Senate and became law. Rehberg voted NO; Tester voted YES.

2009 (Obama):

Initial passage of the health reform law, which became final in 2010: Rehberg voted NO; Tester voted YES.

The $787 billion “stimulus bill,” a package of tax cuts and spending to boost the economy: Passed the House and Senate and became law. Rehberg voted NO; Tester voted YES.

Expansion of the Children’s Health Insurance Program: Passed the House and Senate and became law. Rehberg and Tester both voted YES.

2008, with George W. Bush as president:

The $700 billion bailout of Wall Street/financial institutions: Passed the House and Senate and became law. Rehberg and Tester both voted NO.

The $14 billion loan bailout to the auto industry: Passed the House but eventually stalled in the Senate. The Bush administration approved loans for the auto industry out of Wall Street bailout funds, but left details of the package to the incoming Obama administration. Rehberg and Tester both voted NO.

Grant mortgage relief to struggling homeowners and provide financing to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae: Passed House and Senate and became law. Rehberg voted NO; Tester voted YES.

Overhaul surveillance laws on terrorism suspects: The bill, supported by the Bush administration, said warrantless surveillance is allowed only for non-U.S. citizens, and protected telecom companies from being sued for taking part in prior warrantless surveillance of U.S. citizens. The bill passed. Rehberg voted YES; Tester voted NO.

2007 (Bush):

Increase hourly minimum wage from $5.15 to $7.25, over two years: Passed Senate and House and became law, although the House passed it as part of larger military/disaster funding bill. Rehberg voted NO; Tester voted YES.

Expand warrantless wiretapping of terror suspects for six months: Passed House and Senate and became law. Rehberg voted YES; Tester voted NO.

Copyright 2014 The Billings Gazette. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Follow The Billings Gazette

Popular Stories

Get weekly ads via e-mail

Deals & Offers

Featured Businesses