Yellowstone National Park

May 22, 2014 12:30 am  • 
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  • Janet Chapple, author of the Yellowstone Treasures guidebook, offers these 10 tips for planning a great trip to Yellowstone National Park.

    1. DO plan to camp or reserve lodgings in more than one place. A few nights in each of two to four locales will maximize what you’ll see and minimize driving time.

    2. DON’T expect to see everything in one trip or visit too many different places. Allow time for the unexpected bison jam or to catch a second eruption of a phenomenal geyser.

    3. BE PREPARED to do some walking. Going a mile or two away from any road can be very enjoyable — and is guaranteed to take you away from crowds.

    4. INCLUDE at least one area just outside the park in your itinerary: Cooke City, Cody, Red Lodge, West Yellowstone and the Gallatin Canyon are all beautiful choices.

    5. KNOW the Yellowstone seasons. At 7000- to 8000-foot elevations, spring does not come until sometime in May, and even then some roads may be blocked by snow. Autumn begins early in September, and winter is long. Bring layers of clothing but plenty of sunscreen.

    6. BE AWARE that Yellowstone’s roads are slow, often full of potholes, and that some may be undergoing construction.

    7. PLAN to be on the roads early and late in the day. Avoid crowds by staying off the main roads between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. whenever possible.

    8. TAKE binoculars or a spotting scope as well as your camera, especially for animal watching.

    Cell phone use is still somewhat limited in Yellowstone.

    9. PREPARE THE KIDS: Watch videos, read from books about the area or the animals, tell them how different it will be (wild animals, staying outdoors, no TV). Let them do some of the planning.

    10. CHECK at the visitor center at Old Faithful Village for predicted geyser eruption times. Your patience in waiting for some of the spectacular predictable geysers will be amply rewarded.

    During summer you can call 307-344-2751 for the next eruption times for Old Faithful and a few other geysers.

    Montana native Chapple’s association with Yellowstone goes back to her childhood, when her parents worked at Old Faithful a few summers starting in 1939.

    In 2000, Chapple named her publishing company, Granite Peak Publications, after the highest mountain in Montana in honor of her grandfather Fred Inabnit, who led climbing expeditions in the early 1900s into the Beartooth Range, where Granite Peak is located.

  • Call it 670 miles or perhaps more precisely 674 miles, but either way, the Yellowstone River remains the nation’s longest undammed waterway.

    It’s a great river that gathers some of the finest mountain and prairie topography on the planet as it passes peaks reaching 12,000 feet in elevation, the largest high-mountain lake on the continent, dense evergreen forests, buttes, colorful badlands, deep canyons and sweet-smelling sage and juniper-covered hills. The river meanders through Wyoming and Montana

    When did the name Yellowstone first appear? The answer is a bit fuzzy with several possibilities. Overall though it’s agreed that the earliest designation for this major tributary of the Missouri River originated with the Indian tribes who lived and hunted within its bounds. An early map produced sometime in the 1790s showed the name Crow or Rock River labeled on the stream. In 1797, another map showed “R. des Roches Jaunes” as its moniker. Translated from French into English, that meant “Yellow Stone.”

    Our own research shows that this French name came about because the early French explorers noted a yellowish color to the silt-covered rocks along the banks of the lower Yellowstone River and hence the name. When the Corps of Discovery passed through the upper Missouri in 1805 and again in 1806, they already knew this French name for the river and used various forms of it. Clark’s journal entry of July 15, 1806, when he reached the “Big Bend” of today’s Yellowstone at Livingston, referred to the river as “Rochejhone.”

    Another suggestion is that the French name was a literal translation of a Minnetaree Indian expression that possibly referred to the yellowish sandstone bluffs that are prominent along many parts of the river.

    The Crow Nation called Yellowstone the Elk River because it was a migration route for the elk moving from summer range, high up in present-day Yellowstone Park to their winter habitat along the river’s reaches out on the Montana prairie.

    When President Grant designated Yellowstone National Park on March 1, 1872, the act referred to “a track of land in the territories of Montana and Wyoming, lying near the headwaters of the Yellowstone River.”

    It was only later that discussions between the secretary of the interior and the superintendent of the park finally lead to naming the place Yellowstone National Park.

  • To fully enjoy Yellowstone, prepare to slow down and leave the forward-scramble of your everyday world behind.

    Photography is the art of seeing and it takes time and patience, along with a sense of adventure, to learn to see in new ways. Let your eyes be your guide and use technology to suit your imagination. Here’s a couple examples.

    Visiting a geyser basin? Look for patterns in the water, in the soil, and the wild contrast between the electric colors of bacteria. Look for those that repeat. Notice how the light reflects from the water. Try shots that embrace a wide view and some that focus on details. Shoot from a variety of angles to change the direction of the patterns you find. Horizontal and vertical lines are the most obvious choices, but diagonals and curves create strong visual interest and movement in your pictures.

    In a stream, notice how the water bubbles and swirls. Can you capture a perfect, focused shot of a bubble? Or, would the bubble be more interesting if it was moving? Try both. First hand-hold your camera, then photograph with a tripod — you can get nifty little tripods that work with point-and-shoot cameras. Using a fast shutter speed will freeze the bubble in time; slow shutter speeds will smear it. Watch for reflections of light, for colors in the water reflected from the blue sky or from foliage along the bank and use them in your composition.

    Remember to be aware of your surroundings. Watch for sudden changes in the weather, like a looming thunderstorm, so you and your gear don’t get caught in a downpour. Be aware of the movement of wildlife around you.

    Let your visit to America’s first national park be one of exploration and discovery, with your digital camera offering a creative window to help you to see beyond the surface views. With Yellowstone’s breathtaking scenery and wildlife — does life get any better?

    For Jenna Caplette, life doesn’t get much better than when she’s out with her dog and her camera, moving from attraction to attraction, practicing seeing in new ways. She learns about photography by writing about it. This tip was written with the expert assistance of the staff at F-11 Photographic Supplies in Bozeman.

  • There is a ghostly redwood forest in Yellowstone National Park.

    The trees are identical to the massive pines that grow 200 to 300 feet tall in California.

    The difference is that the Yellowstone redwoods are petrified, not alive. They range in size from broom handle width to 4 feet wide. Stripped of their limbs and most of their bark, the largest stand 40 feet tall, their roots locked in rock. Although now lifeless, the upright logs stand as testimony to a tropical time in Yellowstone’s past, one that ended suddenly and violently.

    Time travel

    Imagine this: About 55 million years ago a vast inland sea that had once covered large portions of Montana was retreating to the east. Just south of where Mount Washburn now rises to 10,243 feet in Yellowstone’s north-central region, a large stratovolcano once stood. For comparison, Washington state’s 14,400-foot Mount Rainier is a massive stratovolcano — a tall peak with gentle slopes at the base rising steeply near the top.

    Stratovolcanoes are known for explosive eruptions. Italy’s Mount Vesuvius, which blew in 79 A.D., was a stratovolcano. The eruption killed thousands of Romans, burying the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum under a dozen feet of ash. It’s estimated the eruption produced flows of hot gas and rock that reached more than 570 degrees. The plume from the eruption shot an estimated 20 miles high, enveloping much of southern Europe under a cloud of ash.

    Fifty million years ago, the Yellowstone volcano’s slopes would have been home to a variety of plant life much different from today. Some of the plants growing there are now found in Southeast Asia — like cinnamon and breadfruit. Also growing on the flanks of the volcano were pine, redwood and sycamore trees.

    “Imagine yourself in a King Kong landscape,” said park geologist Cheryl Jaworowski. “It would have been a humid, tropical environment close to sea level.”

    Rock trees

    It is the remnants of these trees that are now found standing upright at different elevations for about 20 miles along the northwest end of Specimen Ridge in Yellowstone, in what is widely regarded as the largest fossilized forest in the world.

    When they were described in a 1921 publication by geologist F.H. Knowlton, he believed the trees had been buried by volcanic debris over many years. Trees would grow, he theorized, then be covered by volcanic debris upon which a new forest would grow.

    This theory was based on the fact that the petrified trees were found at different elevations along the hillside as it rises 2,000 feet above the floor of the Lamar River valley, and that most of the trees still stood upright.

    Later scientific studies of the forest have poked holes in Knowlton’s theory.

    One found that the petrified trees are so well preserved that scientists could examine the tree growth rings. By comparing the rings of trees at lower elevations with those higher up, scientists saw similar growth patterns indicating they grew through the same patterns of wet and dry years.

    There was also no indication of layers of topsoil associated with the different levels of trees as one would expect to find if they had grown at the site.

    Lack of scientific evidence to back up the multiple burial scenario has prompted creationists to assert that the trees were deposited during the great floods of Noah’s time, as described in the Bible.

    Modern explanation

    “One of the tenets of geology is that the present is a key to the past,” Jaworowski said.

    So when the Washington volcano Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, scientists had a living laboratory to study. Trees uprooted by the volcanic blast were found sunken upright at the bottom of Spirit Lake, below Mount St. Helens, with their root balls still intact.

    The newer theory hypothesizes that Yellowstone’s now-petrified trees were swept off the side of the stratovolcano in a river of melted snow, ash, sand and rock called a lahar, or volcanic debris flow. Silica in the muck invaded the living tree’s cells, eventually turning them into a forest of stone. Twenty-seven layers of petrified forest have been identified, so geologists believe the deposition happened in several events.

    “As far as we know, there were multiple debris flows, not just one massive event,” Jaworowski said.

    The mass of sludge must have been enormous — a catastrophic deposition known to geologists as the Lamar River Formation — as the layer in which the trees are buried measures almost 1,500 feet deep. Most of Barronette and Abiathar peaks, which tower more than 10,400 feet above Soda Butte Creek in the northeast corner of the park, are also composed of this same Lamar River deposition. In fact, much of the northeast corner of the park has this formation as its base layer.

    “It was a place where a lot of sediment accumulated over time,” Jaworowski said. “The Lamar River didn’t exist at that time, it was just sort of a valley bottom.”

    See it yourself

    After describing other areas with fossilized trees, the geologist Knowlton wrote that the ones found in Yellowstone were “the most remarkable fossil forests known.” William Holmes, who first described the fossilized trees in 1878, wrote that while riding horseback along Amethyst Mountain he saw “rows of upright trunks stand out on the ledges like the columns of a ruined temple.”

    There’s a lone petrified tree at the end of a short turnoff between Mammoth Hot Springs and Tower Junction that is the easiest for Yellowstone visitors to see. The tree has been fenced off with wrought iron which, maybe purposely, is not unlike those found around some old gravesites. The high fence is an attempt to keep souvenir seekers from chipping off a chunk of the 50 million-year-old tree.

    At the base of the short trail leading up to the tree is a plaque giving a brief explanation of the theory behind the tree’s existence. A historic photo taken in 1907 shows a second petrified tree, which is now gone thanks to thoughtless souvenir looters.

    Hikers can see the petrified forest by traveling about 5 miles east from Tower Junction. Just before crossing the Lamar River bridge there is a service road to the south. Follow the trail from here, staying on the ridge west of the West Fork of Crystal Creek. The hike is steep. Ranger-led walks are sometimes taken to the area. Inquire at the Tower Junction Ranger Station or the Albright Visitor Center at Mammoth for more information.

    “When you’re up there after that steep, strenuous hike having your lunch, look around and marvel that the tops of those mountains in the distance were once the valley bottom,” Jaworwowski said. “To me, that’s the amazing aspect of what we see in the northeast part of the park.”

    Hikers can also take the 5.5-mile long 7-Mile Hole Trail near Canyon down to Sulphur Creek. It is near here that geologists have found the remains of the stratovolcano’s core.

    While visiting the petrified trees on a sunny day, with the scent of pine wafting pleasingly through the air, it may be easier to imagine a more tropical Yellowstone — one covered with a redwood forest, ferns and exotic spice trees like cinnamon. But there’s even trouble in paradise, as the remains of the ancient volcano’s explosion have shown.

  • Dozens of species of live geckos are special guests this summer at Bozeman’s Museum of the Rockies.

    While the museum always features its world-renowned dinosaur complex filled with one of the world’s largest collections of dinosaur fossils, as well as its massive planetarium and a children’s discovery center, it also has a number of special events and exhibits over the summer.

    Chief among them, the musuem will have its “Geckos — Tails to Toepads” up through Sept. 8. Featuring about 75 different live geckos representing 15 species, the exhibit sprawls over about 6,000 square feet at the museum.

    It includes interactive booths with gecko sounds and other activities.

    The exhibit has been a hit since it opened in February, with the museum registering $10,000 in ticket sales on a single Saturday in March, and Mark Robinson, the museum’s marketing director, expects it to continue into the summer.

    “You can learn about their sticky toe pads and how all of that works,” he said. “Everybody loves it, kids particularly. They keep coming back and coming back. They just get such a kick out of seeing these little tiny animals.”

    Also this summer, the museum will celebrate the 25th anniversary of its Living History Farm, a recreation of the daily life of Montana homesteaders in the late 1890s.

    “Everything down at the farm is pretty much an accurate recreation of that history, of Montana homesteaders,” Robinson said.

    While it’s already a permanent feature included in the cost of a ticket, admission to just the farm will be free through the summer. To celebrate, the farm also plans special daily, weekly and monthly events.

    In addition to the gecko exhibit and farm, the museum has its dinosaur fossil exhibit, a children’s discovery center based on Yellowstone National Park ecology and the recently remodeled Taylor Planetarium.

    Daily admission is $14 for adults, $13 for seniors, $9.50 for children ages 5 to 17 years and free for kids 4 and younger.

    For more information, call the Museum of the Rockies at 406-994-2251 or visit its website at www.museumoftherockies.org.

  • Hundreds of thousands of visitors come each year to Cody, Wyo., equipped with cameras and binoculars, hoping to see an elk, moose, pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, whitetail deer or mule deer.

    Kevin Hurley remembers seeing them all. In a single day.

    “It was in April of 1986, and one of those watershed moments I’ll always remember,” said Hurley, conservation director for the Wild Sheep Foundation in Cody, where there are more bighorn sheep than anywhere else in the state.

    The experience of seeing all of the region’s eight wild ungulates in a single day is part of what makes Cody and the Bighorn Basin a special place for wildlife, and why wildlife are so fundamental to the region’s identity.

    “In the Bighorn Basin, you go from a low spot along the Bighorn River at around 3,000 feet to the top of Franc’s Peak at more than 13,000 feet,” said Hurley, who worked for 24 years as a wildlife biologist for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department.

    That vast contrast in elevation — along with a wide mix of habitat and large tracts of public and undeveloped private land — are all keys to why Cody boasts an unparalleled diversity of big game, large carnivores and even a surprising array of bird species. Rounding out the picture is a network of blue-ribbon trout waters that criss-cross a sparsely populated region of stark and imposing beauty.

    It all adds up to an enduring and compelling relationship between the landscape, animals and people, creating a local economy where tourism and ranching are major forces, and a culture that has long celebrated wildlife in ways that are both commonplace and unique.

    For more than 400,000 tourists who traveled last year between Cody and the East Gate of Yellowstone National Park, wildlife viewing was a big part of the drive along a 52-mile stretch of highway that follows the North Fork of the Shoshone River. The North Fork corridor has long been a magnet for hunters, photographers and wildlife enthusiasts, and is home to several historic dude ranches.

    “A dude ranch lends itself to a more private wildlife viewing experience simply because you are doing it from the back of a horse,” said Colleen Hodson, executive director of the Dude Ranchers’ Association, based in Cody.

    Wildlife viewing has been part of the appeal of dude ranch vacations in Park County for more than 80 years, and it remains one of the most requested activities among guests, Hodson said.

    Critical role in tourism

    Scott Balyo, executive director of the Cody Country Chamber of Commerce, said wildlife “plays a critical role in tourism and visitation.”

    In 2012, Park County saw more than $300 million in direct visitor spending, according to an April 2013 report released by the Wyoming Office of Tourism.

    Visitor surveys conducted by the Park County Travel Council consistently rank wildlife watching as one of the top reasons tourists cite for visiting the area, Balyo said.

    “International visitors, especially, are amazed at their ability to see animals they can’t see in other parts of the world,” Balyo said. “That includes grizzly bears and wolves, which rank high on everyone’s list.”

    The area around Sunlight Basin, near the northeast corner of Yellowstone, has always been good grizzly bear habitat, said Marshall Dominick, whose family has owned the 7D Ranch there since the late 1950s.

    The guest ranch caters to visitors who want a rustic vacation away from TVs, mobile phones and other modern distractions. The past few years have been as busy for the 7D as any in the last half-century, Dominick said, and the 2014 season is already almost sold out.

    Dominick is a board member of Friends of a Legacy, a local nonprofit group that advocates for the McCullough Peak mustangs found in the arid hills east of Cody. The wild horses are a growing attraction for tourists and photographers who are drawn to the iconic image of horses roaming free across the open range.

    The sagebrush steppe throughout the McCullough Peaks is also home to the greater sage-grouse, Dominick said, as well as “an incredible number of songbirds that use that sagebrush for nesting.”

    Rob Koelling, an English professor at Northwest College and an accomplished wildlife photographer, said the farmlands and benches between Cody and Powell are home to an amazing array of birds.

    Koelling’s photos are regular favorites on Facebook and other social media networks, where he shares dazzling images of American kestrels, pheasants, sage grouse, chukars, hummingbirds, golden eagles, rough-legged hawks and migratory shorebirds like sandhill cranes, pelicans and even long-billed curlews.

    On one January evening this year while driving home around dusk, Koelling decided to cruise by a pair of cottonwood trees where he had earlier seen four bald eagles. That’s when he snapped a photo showing more than 20 bald eagles in the two trees, as they took a break from feeding on the nearby carcass of a domestic sheep.

    Ranchers send their sheep into beet fields to graze during the winter, Koelling said, so eagles and other birds of prey know to look for them there.

    Similar connections between agriculture and wildlife can be found throughout the Bighorn Basin, said Katherine Thompson, northwest Wyoming program director for The Nature Conservancy.

    “Just as wildlife is valuable to Cody, the inverse is also true — Cody is valuable to wildlife,” Thompson said. “This area provides winter range, much of it on private ranches, for iconic species moving off the Yellowstone Plateau in the fall. Without access to these large, intact ranches, the region’s wildlife populations would have difficulty surviving our harsh winters.”

    Ranches sustain wildlife

    Doug McWhirter, a Wyoming Game and Fish biologist in Cody, said that large, historic ranches continue to play a key role in sustaining major populations of elk, deer, pronghorn, bighorn sheep and other wildlife.

    “Those private lands are as important as anything in making this whole thing work,” McWhirter said of Cody’s diverse ecosystem.

    “If you like elk, you’ve got to like private lands and the cattle ranches around here, because they support a tremendous number of year-round and wintering animals,” he said.

    The area around Cody, in the rain shadow of the Absaroka Range, is prime elk habitat, said McWhirter, who has extensively studied elk migration patterns around Cody and Yellowstone.

    Elk are an important food source for gray wolves and grizzly bears, he said, two large predators that are relatively abundant around Cody. Black bears, mountain lions, coyotes and red foxes are other predators found in the area, while rare and elusive species like Canada lynx and wolverine are also present.

    Human hunters also flock to Cody in pursuit of elk and other big game, and it was the town’s namesake, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, who was among the first to realize the area’s value as a hunting destination.

    “You have to give Cody credit for really seeing into the future for the role wildlife would play in this region for sport hunting and, to a certain extent even then, tourism,” said Jeremy Johnston, managing editor of the Papers of William F. Cody at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody.

    Cody was instrumental in setting up early wildlife refuges on what is now the Shoshone National Forest, and had “a lot of foresight in seeing the role of hunting in the area’s economic development,” Johnston said.

    Cody’s reputation as a prolific bison hunter was primarily a result of his efforts to feed railroad workers. He was appalled at the wholesale slaughter of bison in obscene numbers by market hunters after only hides and tongues, Johnston said.

    Cody advocated protecting the bison herds in Yellowstone, and wrote articles pushing for the protection of big game species for future generations of hunters.

    Buffalo Bill’s notoriety helped build the area’s reputation among hunters, and attracted many famous sportsmen, including Prince Albert I of Monaco. The prince became the first sitting European head of state to visit the U.S. in 1913. That’s when he joined Buffalo Bill for a hunting trip at spot now known as Camp Monaco, near Pahaska Tepee, Cody’s hunting lodge just east of Yellowstone.

    A century later, Albert’s great-great-grandson, Prince Albert II, visited Cody to award the first Camp Monaco Prize. The $100,000 grant will fund research and education about biodiversity in the region, helping pay for a continuation of elk migration studies begun by McWhirter and others.

    The prince’s visit to Cody last fall coincided with the Buffalo Bill Art Show & Sale, a major annual fundraising event that benefits the Center of the West and Chamber of Commerce. As always, wildlife art played a major role in the show, now entering its 33rd year.

    Wildlife art remains as popular as ever with artists and collectors because it transcends boundaries, said Matt Hall, a past chairman of the show.

    Wildlife forms can be abstract or realist and are popular in paintings and sculptures, said Hall, who is also assistant manager of Caleco Foundry, a Cody firm that specializes in casting bronzes for artists.

    “Wildlife art is universal within many different cultures and styles,” said Hall, adding that some of the earliest cave paintings depict wildlife. “Our connection to wildlife is timeless.”

  • There’s a cool way to train your brain for a trip to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem — stop by the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyo.

    The center is several museums joined together to provide an overarching view of the area’s natural habitats and wild inhabitants, artwork and photography, an enviable firearms collection and American Indian artifacts and history.

    Here’s a quick rundown of what visitors can expect to see when visiting the center:

    Buffalo Bill Museum: As the name intimates, William F. Cody was the reason the center was originally established. The one-time Army scout, buffalo hunter and ringmaster of a worldwide traveling show loved the Cody, Wyo., area and made his home there. As a result, the museum has an eclectic collection of photos, gear and even posters from his Wild West Show.

    Draper Natural History Museum: Visitors can descend through a forest environment from the alpine tundra to the desert-like basin as they walk through these amazing displays that educate users about wildlife, nature and even wildland fires. In addition to taxidermy mounts of Yellowstone animals ranging from moose to cougars, the museum’s Greater Yellowstone Raptor Experience daily introduces live birds of prey from the region to guests.

    Cody Firearms Museum: With a collection of more than 7,000 firearms, visitors will find unique displays even if they aren’t collectors or aficionados. For example, the museum is currently housing an exclusive collection from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History that includes a 7-foot-long gold Miquelet lock musket that was given to President Thomas Jefferson in 1805 by the Bey of Tunisia after the Tripolitan Wars. Or, for more modern pieces, check out the recently acquired Colt .45 pistol that belonged to Lone Ranger television star John Hart.

    Plains Indian Museum: More than 2,000 items were donated to the museum by the Paul Dyck Plains Indian Buffalo Culture Collection in 2007, a portion of which first went on display last year. The collection is being housed in an 1,800-square-foot space designed specifically for the artifacts. The unique items include a woman’s headdress, a decorated buffalo robe and painted rawhide shields.

    Whitney Western Art Museum: After a staff-directed refreshment in mid-May, the museum will welcome visitors to its collection of sculptures and paintings by some of the best-known western artists. In addition, there is an outside sculpture gallery, a replica of Frederic Remington’s studio and Joseph Henry Sharpe’s “Absarokee Hut,” the cabin he stayed in during his years on the Crow Indian Reservation. Some fascinating and engaging photos can also be seen in the John Bunker Sands Photo Gallery and the photography of James Bama can be seen in the Kriendler Gallery.

    McCracken Research Library: For visitors able to spend more time, the center’s library features an incredible collection of photographer Edward S. Curtis’ books “The North American Indian.” Curtis’ books alone contain more than 1,500 photos in the 20 volumes that contain information on each of the continent’s tribes.

    The center is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily through Sept. 15. Admission is $18 for adults, $13 if purchased online. Children 6-17 are admitted for $10, $8 online. Children 5 and younger are admitted free, and seniors 65 and older are admitted for $16, $13 online. Admission is good for two consecutive days. For more information, log on to: centerofthewest.org.

  • Anglers from across the United States and around the world will meet to celebrate “All Things Fly Fishing” at the International Federation of Fly Fishers 49th annual International Fly Fishing Fair from Aug. 5 through 9 in Livingston.

    The event will feature more than 90 workshops and clinics on casting, fly tying and on-water fishing techniques.

    Educational workshops will be taught by instructors, Bob Jacklin, Wayne Luallen, Frank Johnson, Floyd Dean, Bruce Richards, Molly Semenik, Charles Jardine, and others. The workshops are designed to appeal to a broad range of fly fishing interests and skill levels.

    The fly fishing fair features exhibits with the latest in gear, outfitters, conservation information and other topics. Why not try out your new gear fishing the Madison, Firehole, Lamar rivers, and the other local world class waters of Yellowstone Park.

    The organization will also provide the opportunity to see films during the week including the International Fly Fishing Film Festival on Tuesday evening and DamNation by Patagonia on Saturday afternoon at the Dulcie Theatre in the Shane Center.

    Other highlights:

    Fly Tying Theater: view someone up close tying that special fly.

    Youth Activity Center: tie your first fly, cast, paint a fish picture.

    Casting Rendezvous: free casting clinics for all attendees.

    Casting competition: 5-weight casting competition.

    Women’s University: a two-day program tailored for women fly fishers.

    Exhibit Hall open daily Thursday through Saturday at Park High School.

    Free how-to programs

    Aug. 9 will be the Family Fun Day with several youth activities planned for the day, including casting and fly tying lessons, as well as other fun things for the kids to learn.

    Registration is at Park High School, 102 View Vista Drive, Livingston.

    Day passes are available at registration desk for $10.

    The Casting Rendezvous and other free demonstrations will be held at Park High School. Fees vary for workshops.

    Advance registration opens June 2 and closes July 27.

    For further information about the fair, visit www.fedflyfishers.org.

  • The Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary in Red Lodge is the largest sanctuary for Yellowstone ecosystem wildlife in a five-state radius.

    On Saturday, July 5, it will host its annual Wildlife Jamboree, a free day at the sanctuary grounds from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. full of family-friendly activities.

    “It’s kind of a carnival atmosphere,” said Emily Bertino, YWS executive director.

    The sanctuary acts, year-round, as a home to about 65 animals — including representatives of every Yellowstone-area predator except for grizzly bears and the largest publicly displayed raptor collection in Montana — that, for one reason or another, can’t be released back into the wild.

    All of those animals will be on display during the jamboree, but the day offers a number of special extras not normally available. The sanctuary is an education-based organization and will have extra stations set up around the grounds to teach kids and families.

    “It’ll involve interactive educational displays for the kids to learn about the animals,” Bertino said.

    Other activities include face painting and music from local musicians, as well as concessions and raffles.

    The sanctuary is implementing numerous improvements to the grounds — including new educational signage funded by a state grant that should be completed for the jamboree — and funds raised will go toward those improvements, general operations and upgrading resident animal habitats.

    Attendees will also have the opportunity to donate to the sanctuary, including through adopt-an-animal programs or towards specific projects.

    Bertino said that, while it does act as a fundraiser, staff at the sanctuary want to use the jamboree as a showcase of what the sanctuary has to offer to the community of Red Lodge, the greater Yellowstone area and newcomers alike.

    “We continually hope for families from the surrounding area and any visitors to discover us if they’ve never been here before,” she said. “Come on in, get up close with wildlife and discover them and what we can learn about them.”

    For more information, call the Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary at 406-446-1133 or visit its website at www.yellowstonewildlifesanctuary.com.

  • Events are in Billings unless listed otherwise. Double check times and events before traveling.

    May 31

    Virginia City: Virginia City Players perform. “The Cat and the Canary.” Opera House. 1-800-829-2969, ext. 2; virginiacityplayers.com. Showtimes: Sundays at 2 p.m.; Tuesdays at 7 p.m.; Wednesdays at 2 and 7 p.m.; Thursdays at 2 p.m.; Fridays at 7 p.m. and Saturdays at 2 and 7 p.m. Show continues through June 29.

    Sunday, June 1

    Livingston: Comedy play “Barefoot in the Park.” 3 p.m. Blue Slipper Theatre. $15 adults; $12 seniors, students. Reservations, 406-222-7720; blueslipper.com.

    Cody, Wyo.: Cody Night Rodeo, Every night at 8 p.m. through Aug. 31. 76th year. http://www.codystampederodeo.com/events.aspx?c=12

    Thursday, June 5

    Kenny Rogers: 7:30 p.m. Alberta Bair Theater, 2801 Third Ave. N. $59.50, $69.50. 256-6052, 877-321-2074; albertabairtheater.org.

    Rickie Lee Jones: 8 p.m. Babcock Theatre, 2812 Second Ave. N. $39.50 reserved seating. Tickets300 box office, 2911 Third Ave. N. 866-300-8300; Jadepresents.com.

    Friday, June 6

    Free admission: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Yellowstone Art Museum, 401 N. 27th St. Commemorates Will James’ birthday. Works by James on display in permanent collection. 256-6804; artmuseum.org.

    Opening of “Shrek: The Musical”: 7:30 p.m. Billings Studio Theatre, 1500 Rimrock Road. $20 adults; $17 students. 248-1141; Performances continue through June 28. Check billingsstudiotheatre.com for details

    Red Lodge: Artwalk. 5-7 p.m. Downtown. Shops, galleries highlight various artists, offer free refreshments. Now expanded throughout downtown Red Lodge, including retail stores, galleries, jewelers, others. Some shops open past 7 p.m. Free admission to Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Redlodge.com.

    Red Lodge: Reception. 5-7 p.m. Red Lodge Clay Center. Works by Robert Briscoe; Lichman & Adler through June 27. 446-3993; redlodgeclaycenter.com.

    Saturday, June 7

    Red Lodge: Founders Day at the Museum: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free annual event, this year celebrates 100th anniversary of Elks Lodge Building. Events include Historic Downtown Walking Tours 10 a.m., noon; historic tours of Pollard Hotel 11 a.m., 1 p.m.; History of the Elks program with Pam Todd at Carbon County Historical Society & Museum 2 p.m. Food, music, entertainment at Elks Club. 446-3667; redlodge.com.

    SpringFest: Moss Mansion, 914 Division St., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Featuring arts and crafts vendors, food concessions, and live entertainment and a kid’s corner with carnival style games. 406-256-5100.

    Montana Renaissance Festival: 16th Century European Country on the grounds of ZooMontana. Ken Haak, 406-256-6804 or montanarenfest.com.

    Monday, June 9

    “The Greatest Love of All” Whitney Houston tribute: 7:30 p.m. Alberta Bair Theater, 2801 Third Ave. N. 256-6052, 877-321-2074; albertabairtheater.org.

    Wednesday, June 11

    Ralston, Wyo.: Jake Clark Mule Days. Western event promoting the saddle mule which includes mounted shooting, team sorting, rodeo events, trail course and parade. Events continue through June 15. 307-754-4320. www.saddlemule.com.

    Saturday, June 14

    Free Kids’ Day, Yellowstone Art Museum’s 50th birthday party: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. YAM parking lot, 401 N. 27th St. Children can create art, paint on large-scale canvases, mark on sidewalk; receive “passport” to get stamped at each booth. Games, food, hourly piñata drop. Free. 256-6804; artmuseum.org.

    Heart & Sole Run: Start at St. Vincent Healthcare, 12th Avenue North and North 30th Street. Finish at Dehler Park. 5K, 2-mile, 10K, Montana Active Life Festival at park with free family fun, music, interactive booths. Proceeds benefit YMCA Strong Community Campaign and Billings trail system. Register online, heartandsolerace.org.

    Strawberry Festival: 7:30 a.m. pancake breakfast; 8 a.m. 100-plus arts and crafts vendors, kids’ activities, food, live entertainment. 259-5454; strawberryfun.com.

    Red Lodge: Red Lodge Music Festival faculty recital: 7:30 p.m. Civic Center. Redlodgemusicfestival.org.

    Virginia City: “The Cat and the Canary.” 2 and 7 p.m. Opera House, 338 W.

    Sunday, June 15

    Red Lodge: Red Lodge Music Festival, Band and Orchestra Festival Finale. 1:30 p.m. Civic Center. Free. Redlodgemusicfestival.org.

    Thursday, June 19

    High Noon Lecture Series: Noon. Western Heritage Center, 2822 Montana Ave. The Montana Inspiration Project, “Reflections on Place” with musician Patrick Zentz. 256-6809; ywhc.org.

    Alive After 5, The Clintons: 5 p.m. The Depot, 2310 Montana Ave. Free; wristbands to purchase alcohol $1. Aliveafter5.com.

    Red Lodge: Historic walking tour. 5 p.m. Downtown. Meet at Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Guided tour. Handouts provided. Free for members; $2 nonmembers. Redlodge.com.

    Sheridan, Wyo.: Big Horn Country USA camping and music festival. Trails End Concert Park. Music by Lady Antebellum, Brantley Gilbert, Thomas Rhett, Brett Eldridge, Joe Nichols, Jana Kramer, more. 307-675-1027; bighorncountryusa.com.

    Friday, June 20

    Sheridan, Wyo.: Big Horn Country USA camping and music festival. Trails End Concert Park. 307-675-1027; bighorncountryusa.com.

    Saturday, June 21

    Art & Soul Festival: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. North 29th Street, between Second Avenue North and Third Avenue North. Free vendor and street fair. $5 workshops, classes at various businesses 252-4398.

    Chalk on the Walk: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Third Avenue North between North 27th Street and North 30th Street. Participants create works on sidewalks. Bring own chalk. In conjunction with Art & Soul Festival. Entry forms at Barjon’s Books. 252-4398.

    Fishtail: Family Fun Day. Main Street. Breakfast 8 a.m. Vendors, yard sales 9 a.m. One-Mile Long Parade 11 a.m. Very Fishy Auction 12:30 p.m. Duck race 1:30 p.m. Kids’ activities, petting zoo at Family Park. Benefits community projects including Community Center maintenance, scholarship fund. 406-328-4788.

    Kaycee, Wyo.: Hole in the Wall Tour. Guided historic tour through famous Red Wall country. Retraces paths of famed outlaws, lawmen, cowboys; stories, narration by historians. $85, includes continental breakfast, lunch. Registration, Hoofprints of the Past Museum, 307-738-2381, 970-251-0981. Hoofprintsofthepast.org.

    Sheridan, Wyo.: Big Horn Country USA camping and music festival. Trails End Concert Park. 307-675-1027; bighorncountryusa.com.

    Cody, Wyo.: 33rd Annual Plains Indian Museum Powwow at the Robbie Powwow Garden on the grounds of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. 307-578-4102. www.centerofthewest.org.

    Sunday, June 22

    Cody, Wyo.: 33rd Annual Plains Indian Museum Powwow at the Robbie Powwow Garden on the grounds of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. 307-578-4102. www.centerofthewest.org.

    Wednesday, June 25

    Hardin: Fort Custer and Plains Indian Exhibit. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Big Horn County Historical Museum east of Hardin. Part of Little Bighorn Days through Sunday.

    Hardin: Quilt show. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Big Horn County Library, 419 N. Custer Ave. Big Horn Undercover Gals. Part of Little Bighorn Days through Saturday.

    Hardin: Dick Chapple’s Train-O-Rama model train display. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Historic Depot, 10 E. Railroad St. Part of Little Bighorn Days, through Sunday.

    Thursday, June 26

    Hardin: Grand Ball March. 7:30 p.m. 200 block of Center Ave. $30 in advance only. Light dinner included. Observers pay small fee. (dance instruction 1-2:15 p.m., $5).

    Bozeman: Music on Main. Main Street between Rouse Avenue and Black Avenue. Weekly concert series kick-off. Children’s activities, 6:30-8 p.m. Music by The Clintons, 7 p.m. Downtownbozeman.org.

    Three Forks: Headwaters Country Jam. Headliners include Big & Rich, Montgomery Gentry, Sammy Kershaw, Dustin Lynch, Chase Rice, LoCash Cowboys. Headwaterscountryjam.com.

    Friday, June 27

    Crow Agency: Battle of the Little Bighorn Reenactment. 1 p.m. South of Crow Agency between the Little Bighorn National Park/Museum and Garryowen/Custer’s Battlefield Museum. littlebighornreenactment.com.

    Hardin: Little Big Horn Symposium. 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Centre Cinema & Video, 317 N. Center. $10.

    Hardin: Old West Youth Parade. 11 a.m. Downtown Center Avenue.

    Hardin: Custer’s Last Stand Reenactment. 2-3 p.m. Six miles west of Hardin on Old US 87. $20 ages 13 and over, $8 ages 6-12. (pre-show 1-2 p.m.)

    Virginia City: “The Cat and the Canary.” 7 p.m. Opera House, 338 W. Wallace St. Virginia City Players perform. $18 ages 18 and up; $16 for those over age 60, college students and military; $10 ages 17 and under. 1-800-829-2969, ext. 2; virginiacityplayers.com.

    Saturday, June 28

    Vintage Vehicle Show: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. North 26th Street between the Yellowstone Art Museum’s two buildings. Non-juried show of vehicles at least 30 years old or those that promise to be classics some day. Entry form at artmuseum.org. For information: 256-6804, ext. 236 or events@artmuseum.org.

    Crow Agency: Battle of the Little Bighorn Reenactment. 1 p.m. South of Crow Agency between the Little Bighorn National Park/Museum and Garryowen/Custer’s Battlefield Museum. littlebighornreenactment.com.

    Hardin: Little Big Horn Days Parade. 10 a.m. Downtown. Free.

    Hardin: Demolition Derby. 1 p.m. Fairgrounds. $10 ages 13 and over, $5 ages 6-12.

    Hardin: Custer’s Last Stand Reenactment. 2-3 p.m. Six miles west of Hardin on Old US 87. $20 ages 13 and over, $8 ages 6-12. (pre-show 1-2 p.m.)

    Hardin: Confederate Railroad. 8:30 p.m. 300 block of Center Avenue. Free.

    Sunday, June 29

    Crow Agency: Battle of the Little Bighorn Reenactment. 1 p.m. South of Crow Agency between the Little Bighorn National Park/Museum and Garryowen/Custer’s Battlefield Museum. littlebighornreenactment.com.

    Hardin: Custer’s Last Stand Reenactment. 2-3 p.m. Six miles west of Hardin on Old US 87. $20 ages 13 and over, $8 ages 6-12. (pre-show 1-2 p.m.)

    Symphony in the Park: This free outdoor community concert is a great way to take in the Billings Symphony Orchestra at Pioneer Park. Picnicking begins at 4 p.m., an instrument ‘petting zoo’ at 5 p.m. and the main concert at 7 p.m. 406-252-3610 or www.billingssymphony.org.

    Tuesday, July 1

    Cody, Wyo.: Cody Stampede rodeo. July 1-3 at 8 p.m.

    Virginia City: Virginia City Players perform “On the Gold Trail with Deadwood Dick.” Opera House, 1-800-829-2969, ext. 2; virginiacityplayers.com. Shows continue through Aug. 3.

    Wednesday, July 2

    Livingston: Festival of the Arts. Depot Rotary Park. 406-222-2300; livingstonedepot.org.

    Livingston: Roundup rodeo. 8 p.m. Parade 3 p.m. Livingston-chamber.com.

    Red Lodge: Home of Champions Rodeo. 6 p.m. Fairgrounds. Noon parade for all ages. 446-2422; redlodgerodeo.com.

    Thursday, July 3

    Cody, Wyo.: Stampede parade, 9:30 a.m., downtown.

    Livingston: Festival of the Arts. Depot Rotary Park. 406-222-2300; livingstonedepot.org.

    Livingston: Roundup rodeo. 8 p.m. Livingston-chamber.com.

    Red Lodge: Home of Champions Rodeo. 6 p.m. Fairgrounds. Noon parade for all ages. 446-2422; redlodgerodeo.com.

    West Yellowstone: Celebrating America. Visitors Center. Burger bash benefits Hebgen Basin Volunteer Fire Department. Live music, parade 6 p.m. Fireworks 10 p.m. Destinationyellowstone.com.

    Friday, July 4

    Cody, Wyo.: Stampede parade, 9:30 a.m., downtown.

    Cody, Wyo.: Cody Stampede rodeo. 5 p.m.

    West Yellowstone: The Hebgen Basin Volunteer Fire Department hosts its Burger Bash barbecue at the Visitors Center, with all proceeds going to help fund various community needs. Live music, a parade at 6 p.m., and fireworks at 10 p.m. are also part of the celebration in one of the nation’s most beautiful and treasured regions. Destinationyellowstone.com.

    Livingston: Festival of the Arts. Depot Rotary Park. 406-222-2300; livingstonedepot.org.

    Red Lodge: Artwalk. 5-7 p.m. Downtown. Includes retail stores, galleries, jewelers, others. Some shops open past 7 p.m. Redlodge.com.

    Laurel: Thomson Park. All day activities include pancake breakfast, Chief Joseph Run kiddie parade, grand parade, food and craft fair, live entertainment, fireworks at night. 628-8105; laurelmontana.org.

    Livingston: Roundup rodeo. 8 p.m. Livingston-chamber.com.

    Red Lodge: Home of Champions Rodeo: 3 p.m. Fairgrounds. Noon parade for all ages. 446-2422; redlodgerodeo.com.

    Virginia City: Specatcular Fourth of July Fireworks at Dusk.

    Thursday, July 10

    Alive After 5, South Park Line: 5 p.m. Walkers American Grill, 2700 First Ave. N. Music TBA. Free; wristbands to purchase alcohol $1. Aliveafter5.com.

    St. John’s Summer Concert: Barbecue, opener 6 p.m. Headliner 7 p.m. St. John’s Lutheran Ministries, 3940 Rimrock Road. Tom Catmull’s Radio Static headlines. Jerod Birchell opens. Free.

    Red Lodge: Historic walking tour. 5 p.m. Downtown. Meet at Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Guided tour. Handouts provided. Free for members; $2 nonmembers. Redlodge.com.

    Friday, July 11

    Bozeman: Art Walk. 6-8 p.m. Downtown and Emerson Center for Arts and Culture. Downtownbozeman.org.

    Saturday, July 12

    Summerfair: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Veterans Park (Poly Drive and 13th Street West, next to Rocky Mountain College). Region’s largest juried arts and crafts festival. Food, activities, entertainment through Sunday. Admission: $3 for ages 18, older. (One-time admission price is good for both days). Ages 17 and younger admitted free. Benefits Yellowstone Art Museum. 256-6804; artmuseum.org.

    Red Lodge: Art in the Beartooths. 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Lion’s Club Park. Art fair. Events include 30-artist paint-out 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Free admission. Signature artists Kevin Red Star, Susan Spero, David McMasters. In the evening ($50): Live, silent auctions; dinner, libations, entertainment under tents. Benefits Carbon County Arts Guild. 446-1370; carboncountydepotgallery.org.

    Red Lodge: Geology, Ecology Tour of the Beartooth Mountains. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Dr. Marv Kauffman, geologist, and Dr. Phil Robertson, ecologist, lead. $50, includes lunch. 446-3667; carboncountyhistory.com.

    Sunday, July 13

    Summerfair: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Veterans Park. Benefits Yellowstone Art Museum. 256-6804; artmuseum.org.

    Red Lodge: Beartooth Run. 8:30 a.m. 5K and 10K climbing to altitudes above 10,000 feet. Beartoothrun.com.

    Thursday, July 17

    High Noon Lecture Series: Noon. Western Heritage Center, 2822 Montana Ave. The Montana Inspiration Project, “Reflections on Place” with poet, musician Danielle Egnew. 256-6809; ywhc.org.

    Livingston: Charlie Daniels Band. 7:30 p.m. Music Ranch Montana. musicranchmontana.net.

    Friday, July 18

    Big Sky State Games opening ceremonies: Daylis Stadium. bigskygames.org; 254-7426.

    Livingston: Summerfest Along the Yellowstone. Kids’ activities, basketball shoot, bear garden, live music, arts and crafts, food. Benefits recreation department. livingstonmusicfestival.com.

    Red Lodge: 20th Annual Beartooth Rally. Rides, poker run, food, entertainment through Sunday. 446-2022, 888-827-2663; bonedaddyscustomcycle.com.

    Saturday, July 19

    Livingston: Summerfest Along the Yellowstone. Kids’ activities, basketball shoot, bear garden, live music, arts and crafts, food. Benefits recreation department. livingstonmusicfestival.com.

    Red Lodge: Beartooth Rally. 446-2022, 888-827-2663; bonedaddyscustomcycle.com.

    Sunday, July 20

    Livingston: Summerfest Along the Yellowstone. Kids’ activities, basketball shoot, bear garden, live music, arts and crafts, food. Benefits recreation department. livingstonmusicfestival.com.

    Red Lodge: Beartooth Rally. 446-2022, 888-827-2663; bonedaddyscustomcycle.com.

    Thursday, July 24

    St. John’s Summer Concert: Barbecue, opener 6 p.m. Headliner 7 p.m. St. John’s Lutheran Ministries, 3940 Rimrock Road. John Roberts y Pan Blanco headlines. Jaded Ladies open. Free.

    Red Lodge: Historic walking tour. 5 p.m. Downtown. Meet at Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Guided tour. Handouts provided. Free for members; $2 nonmembers. Redlodge.com.

    White Sulphur Springs: Red Ants Pants Music Festival kick-off. 8 p.m. “Street Dance: The Bus Driver Tour” kicks off annual weekend of music. Rain or shine. 3-day festival pass: $125 advance, $140 at gate. 1-day: $50/$55. Ages 13 and younger are free. Camping: $15 per person for 3 p.m. Thursday through noon Sunday. 406-209-8135; redantspantsmusicfestival.com.

    Friday, July 25

    Red Lodge: Cruisen Red Lodge. Registration, 8 a.m. 664-3264; cruisenredlodge.com.

    White Sulphur Springs: Red Ants Pants Music Festival. 4 p.m. Jessie Veeder, Holly Williams, Ian Tyson, Jason Isbell. Rain or shine. 3-day pass: $125 advance, $140 at gate. 1-day: $50/$55. Free for ages 13, younger. 406-209-8135; redantspantsmusicfestival.com.

    Saturday, July 26

    Red Lodge: Cruisen Red Lodge. Classic car show along Broadway Avenue 8 am. Awards 2 p.m. Drive-in movie at Red Lodge Airport at dusk. 664-3264; cruisenredlodge.com.

    White Sulphur Springs: Red Ants Pants Music Festival. Noon. Tom Catmull’s Radio Static, Baskery, JD McPherson, James McMurtry, Matt Andersen, Josh Ritter, Brandi Carlile. 406-209-8135; redantspantsmusicfestival.com.

    Sunday, July 27

    Red Lodge: Cruisen Red Lodge. Drag races at airport 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 664-3264; cruisenredlodge.com.

    White Sulphur Springs: Red Ants Pants Music Festival. Noon. Charley Pride headlines. Red Molly, Black Lillies, Corb Lund also perform. 406-209-8135; redantspantsmusicfestival.com.

    Tuesday, July 29

    Three Days Grace: 7:30 p.m. Shrine Auditorium, 1125 Broadwater Ave. $27.50 advance, $30 day of show. Box office; Ernie November; Tickets300 box office, 2911 Third Ave. N. 866-300-8300; 1111presents.com.

    Thursday, July 31

    St. John’s Summer Concert: Barbecue, opener 6 p.m. Headliner 7 p.m. St. John’s Lutheran Ministries, 3940 Rimrock Road. Midlife Chryslers headlines. Ellen & The Old School opens. Free.

    Virginia City: “On the Gold Trail with Deadwood Dick.” 2 and 7 p.m. Opera House, 338 W. Wallace St. Virginia City Players perform. $18 ages 18 and up; $16 for those over age 60, college students and military; $10 ages 17 and under. 1-800-829-2969, ext. 2; virginiacityplayers.com.

    Friday, Aug. 1

    Artwalk: 5-9 p.m. artwalkbillings.com.

    Bozeman: Sweet Pea Festival. 4 p.m. Lindley Park. sweetpeafestival.org; 406-586-4003.

    Red Lodge: Artwalk. 5-7 p.m. Downtown. Includes retail stores, galleries, jewelers, others. Some shops open past 7 p.m. Redlodge.com.

    Red Lodge: Festival of Nations. Ethnic dancing, music, games, food and more celebrate the town’s rich cultural diversity. Parade downtown. Free admission. Through Aug. 2. 406-426-0913; redlodgefestivalofnations.com.

    West Yellowstone: Smoking Waters Mountain Man Rendezvous & Living History Encampment. Trader’s Row, entertainment, seminars, tomahawk and knife demonstrations, black-powder shoots, mountain-man storytelling, musicians through Aug. 10. Free admission. Twoturtlestradingpost.com.

    Sheridan, Wyo.: Rock’n the Railroad Rock Festival. Through Saturday with Ted Nugent, Cheap Trick, Winger, Stryper, Warrant, Trixter, Quiet Riot, Vixen, LA Guns, Sweet and more. Trails End Concert Park. 307-675-1027.

    Saturday, Aug. 2

    Bozeman: Sweet Pea Festival. sweetpeafestival.org; 406-586-4003.

    Pompeys Pillar: Clark Days. At the national monument. Historical talks, nature walks, cultural presentations. 406-939;pompeyspillar.org.

    Red Lodge: Climb to Conquer Cancer. Red Lodge Mountain Resort. Scenic hike benefits American Cancer Society. Cancer survivor breakfast, registration, 8:30 a.m. Race, 9:30 a.m. 406-373-8491, 800-227-2345; climbrl.org.

    Red Lodge: Festival of Nations. redlodgefestivalofnations.com.

    Sheridan, Wyo.: Rock’n the Railroad Rock Festival. 307-675-1027.

    Sunday, Aug. 3

    Bozeman: Sweet Pea Festival. sweetpeafestival.org; 406-586-4003.

    Pompeys Pillar: Clark Days. At the national monument. Historical talks, nature walks, cultural presentations.;pompeyspillar.org.

    Tuesday, Aug. 5

    Virginia City: Virginia City Players perform “Dracula.” Opera House, 338 W. Wallace St. 800-829-2969, ext. 2; virginiacityplayers.com. Performances through Sept. 1.

    Thursday, Aug. 7

    High Noon Lecture Series: Noon. Western Heritage Center, 2822 Montana Ave. The Montana Inspiration Project, “Reflections on Place” with Charlie Ringer, kinetic sculptor. 256-6809; ywhc.org.

    Sheridan, Wyo.: Reception, award ceremony “29th Annual Watercolor Wyoming National Exhibition.” Sagebrush Community Art Center. Juried show, sale features watercolors by local, regional, national artists through Aug. 29.

    Livingston: Fishwalk. 5:30-10 p.m. Main Street. Fish-themed events, fly casting rodeo, crafts and kids games, food, live concert.

    Red Lodge: Historic walking tour. 5 p.m. Downtown. Meet at Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Guided tour. Handouts provided. Free for members; $2 nonmembers. Redlodge.com.

    Three Forks: Rockin’ the Rivers pre-party. The Bridge, off of Highway 2, four miles east of Lewis and Clark Caverns. Blue Tattoo, Hells Belles, Jared Stewart. 406-285-0099, 866-285-0097; rockintherivers.com.

    Friday, Aug. 8

    MontanaFair: MetraPark. Through Aug. 16. montanafair.com, metrapark.com.

    Chris Young, Danielle Bradbery: 7 p.m. Rimrock Auto Arena at MetraPark. $45 premium, $35 reserved, $25 general admission. Box office, 256-2422, 800-366-8538; metrapark.com.

    Magic City Blues: 2300-2500 Montana Ave. Gates open, 5 p.m. On the Stillwater Stage: TBA at 5:30, 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m. On the Budweiser Stage: Matthew Curry, 6:30 p.m.; TBA, 8:30 p.m.; Jonny Lang, 10:30 p.m. Ages 18 and older. Tickets at Holiday Stationstores; Rimrock Mall; Cactus Records (Bozeman); 534-0400; magiccityblues.com.

    Red Lodge: Red Lodge Fringe Festival concert. 7:30 p.m. St. Agnes Church. Four Shillings Short performs.

    Three Forks: Rockin’ the Rivers. Rail, Vixen, Lita Ford, Winger, Queensryche, Sin City Sinners. General admission $55, 3-day $143; package for one includes reserved camp spot $208, for 3 $315. 406-285-0099, 866-285-0097; rockintherivers.com.

    Saturday, Aug. 9

    Magic City Blues: South Park. Gates open 2:30 p.m. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Ave., Ben Harper & Charlie Musselwhite. magiccityblues.com.

    Train: 7 p.m. Rimrock Auto Arena at MetraPark. $60 VIP reserved, $45 premium reserved, $35 reserved, $25 general admission. Box office, 256-2422, 800-366-8538; metrapark.com.

    Three Forks: Rockin’ the Rivers. The Bridge, off of Highway 2, four miles east of Lewis and Clark Caverns. Bobaflex, Aranda, The Pretty Reckless, Pop Evil, Hinder, Blistered Earth. rockintherivers.com.

    Sunday, Aug. 10

    Magic City Blues: South Park. Gates open 2:30 p.m. Huey Lewis and The News, 7 to 8:30 p.m. All ages. $49 advance, $60 day of show. 534-0400; magiccityblues.com.

    Pop Evil, Adelita’s Way: 7 p.m. Rimrock Auto Arena at MetraPark. $45 festival floor, $35 reserved, $25 general admission. Box office, 256-2422, 800-366-8538; metrapark.com.

    Red Lodge: Red Lodge Fringe Festival concert. 7:30 p.m. St. Agnes Church. Red Lodge Chamber Players performs.

    Three Forks: Rockin’ the Rivers. The Bridge, off of Highway 2, four miles east of Lewis and Clark Caverns. Babys, Cosmo, Jefferson Starship, April Wine, Black Stone Cherry. 406-285-0099, 866-285-0097; rockintherivers.com.

    Thursday, Aug. 14

    Red Lodge: Historic walking tour. 5 p.m. Downtown. Meet at Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Guided tour. Handouts provided. Free for members; $2 nonmembers. Redlodge.com.

    Saturday, Aug. 16

    Huntley: Threshing Bee. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Huntley Project Musem of Irrigated Agriculture. Steam and gas threshing with events for the whole family. antiquetractorclub.org/2014threshingbee.

    Kirkwood: Annual trout cook-off. Kirkwood Resort. Health, education classes at 9 a.m. Sailboat races, fly-casting lessons, kayak rides, teams cooking trout entries follow. Any fish caught from Hebgen Lake this summer and used in an entry add points to the score. Kirkwoodresort.com.

    Lewistown: Montana Cowboy Poetry Gathering. Yogo Inn. Western Art & Gear Show, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Poetry, music sessions, 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30 p.m. Sons of the San Joaquin concert with Mary Kaye, Ol’ Ugly, Bob Petermann, Owen Badgett at Fergus Center ($20; $30, reserved; $50, VIP with meet and greet), 6:30 p.m. 406-538-4575; montanapoetrygathering.com.

    Red Lodge: “Gotta Gig Gotta Go! with Billy Waldo and the Flying Grizzlies.” 7 p.m. Bueg Arena and Event Center. Waldo, Lee Moran, Jimmy Kujala, Todd Loughrie, Pete Burak, Charlie Brandine, Paul “Dirt” Stauss, Mark Biernbaum perform to benefit The Stano Bustos Memorial Foundation in support of academic, athletic and artistic pursuits of local youth. Redlodge.com.

    Virginia City: “Dracula.” 2 and 7 p.m. Opera House, 338 W. Wallace St. Virginia City Players perform. $18 ages 18 and up; $16 for those over age 60, college students and military; $10 ages 17 and under. 1-800-829-2969, ext. 2; virginiacityplayers.com.

    Thursday, Aug. 21

    Alive After 5 Family Fun Night, Midlife Chryslers: 5 p.m. North 31st Street and Fourth Avenue North. Kids’ activities include crafts, games, climbing wall, bouncy slide. Free; wristbands to purchase alcohol $1. Hosted by Downtown Billings Association. Aliveafter5.com.

    Red Lodge: Historic walking tour. 5 p.m. Downtown. Meet at Carbon County Historical Society and Museum. Guided tour. Handouts provided. Free for members; $2 nonmembers. Redlodge.com.

    Friday, Aug. 29

    Burn the Point: Downtown. Parade. Street dance follows at SkyPoint. Free for spectators. Entry fees benefit Chase Hawks Memorial funds for families in crisis. Burnthepoint.com.

    Saturday, Aug. 30

    Burn the Point car show: MetraPark. Swap meet, car corral. Admission and entry fees benefit Chase Hawks Memorial funds for families in crisis. Burnthepoint.com.

    Monday, Sept. 1

    Red Lodge: 35rd Annual Labor Day Arts Fair: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Lions Club Park and Carbon County Arts Guild & Depot Gallery. Works by more than 80 regional artists. Food, entertainment throughout day. Free admission. 446-1370; carboncountydepotgallery.org.

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