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Big business, big stories: Go behind scenes of Wall Street, Silicon Valley
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Big business, big stories: Go behind scenes of Wall Street, Silicon Valley

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Wall Street

Pedestrians pass the New York Stock Exchange in New York.

Wall Street and Silicon Valley are two of the most elusive and exclusive business capitals in the world. Teeming with uber wealthy businesspeople, landing a position in either of these locales may seem like the ultimate dream ... until you actually get there — and experience the fierce pressures that bring out the best (and often, the worst) in people.

This selection of books includes stories both true and fictitious sharing one common theme: They reveal exactly what happens behind the curtain at the companies that dominate the global financial and technology markets.

Looking for something new to read? Try these 6 paperbacks

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