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Four Castle Rock Middle School students cited last month with charges related to methamphetamine found in the school are unlikely to face formal charges, a police spokesman said Wednesday.

Billings Police Sgt. Kevin Iffland said Youth Court Services authorities have indicated that the cases involving the students will most likely be handled informally. As a result, information about the students and the status of the cases will remain confidential.

Police and school officials said last month that two 14-year-old boys and two 14-year-old girls were suspended from school and later were issued felony and misdemeanor citations after methamphetamine was found in the school on March 14.

Information about the incident was first made public by Castle Rock Principal Shaun Harrington in a letter to parents.

Harrington said he learned that a student had brought five baggies of meth to school and had showed it to other students, one of whom alerted an adult.

Harrington said the boys hid two of the bags behind a mirror in a school bathroom.

As Harrington pulled one of the boys out of class, the boy hid the remaining three baggies under a desk. Two of those baggies were then flushed down a toilet by other students.

All four students were placed on emergency suspension, school officials said. The status of those suspensions was unclear Wednesday, and Superintendent Keith Beeman did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

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One of the boys was cited with a felony offense of criminal possession of dangerous drugs. The second boy received a felony citation of criminal possession of dangerous drugs by accountability.

The girls were cited with misdemeanor offenses of obstructing justice.

The students were scheduled to meet with Youth Court authorities earlier this month. If formal charges are filed, the names of the juveniles and the alleged offenses are a public record.

If the cases remain in Youth Court Services, an informal agreement is reached that often includes both punishment and rehabilitation programs for the accused juvenile offender. Those cases remain confidential.

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