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I hope you all saw the half-page ad in this newspaper last week from an outfit known as "CO2isgreen."

Someone finally had the common sense, the guts and, apparently, the dough, to get the truth out to the American public. Among the plain-as-the-nose-on-your-face facts presented in the ad were these:

• High concentrations of CO2, or carbon dioxide, "actually help ecosystems support more plant and animal life."

• Carbon dioxide "is not even close to being the most important part of greenhouse gases."

• Carbon dioxide "is NOT pollution and more CO2 results in a greener earth."

The ad closes with this brilliant formulation: "Because plants and animals need CO2. Life on Earth needs CO2. CO2 is green."

All true! What kind of morons would want not only to limit carbon dioxide, but to "sequester" it in the ground, putting it out of reach for plants and animals that will die without it? Sequester juries if you want to, you crazy politicians, but get your paws off my carbon dioxide!

And while we're at it, let's look at other scientific facts that refute some of the blatant brainwashing we are all subjected to nowadays.

Have you ever been told not to look at the sun because you might go "blind"? Yeah, right, Einstein. Just try reading a book outside at night. If it's dark enough, you can't do it. But just wait till the sun comes up and it's a snap.

So, I ask you, how could you possibly go blind by looking at the very object that makes it possible for you to see?

Likewise, have you ever heard one of those Mr. Smarty-Pants science guys talk about the supposed phenomenon of "drowning"? In water!

Water is the life-giving liquid. Without it, all forms of life on this planet would cease to exist. Water is what makes the grass green, what gives us flowers, what makes it possible for little baby calves to grow into big fat T-bone steaks.

How could water, which gives us all these good things, also kill us? What kind of idiots do these supposed scientists think we are?

The potato, mapped

If only all our scientists were as down-home and understandable as the researchers from 14 countries who make up the Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium. Last week, the consortium released a draft of the genetic structure of the potato, which is now the second leading food crop, after rice, to have its genome mapped.

Here's how the consortium described its important work: "A high-quality, well-annotated genome sequence of potato, combined with established mapping techniques and the continuing advances in high throughput analyses of the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome promises to radically enhance our ability to identify the desirable allelic variants of genes underlying important quantitative traits in potato."

If you can't understand that simple bit of science, you'd better learn this phrase: "You want fries with that?"

No limes, though

Speaking of scientists and water, it was also reported last week that ice has been discovered on the moon.

As one story put it: "This discovery may well revolutionize our understanding of the nature of the moon's surface, experts say, and it has geologists eager to go back to the moon and dig up some lunar dirt."

What was unstated but obvious is that geologists are so eager to get back to moon because now they can finally enjoy a real gin and tonic on Earth's satellite.

An Addison appreciation

And there's this: The family of Addison Bragg is inviting "friends and fans" of the longtime Gazette columnist to attend a celebration of Addison's life today.

The gathering will run from 2 to 6 p.m. at The Rex, 2401 Montana Ave. Hors d'oeuvres, appetizers, beer and wine will be provided.

Addison worked for The Gazette for 30 years and continued to write his weekly Bragg About Billings column for another 26 years after retiring in 1980. He died in May at the age of 90.

Good food, good drink, good people - it's just the kind of gathering Addison would have enjoyed.

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