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Concert to benefit monastery project On Sept. 30, 1999, Poor Clare Sisters Catherine, Judith Ann, Maryalice and Jane arrived in Montana to establish a contemplative community. Now, the sisters, who reside in Great Falls, are beginning to raise funds to build a permanent monastery. The first step in achieving that goal is a harp and piano concert which will be presented tonight by the Rev. Robert Hutmacher, a Franciscan and a friend of the sisters. The concert will begin at 7 p.m. at St. Piux X Catholic Church, at the corner of 18th Street West and Broadwater Avenue.The concert is free, but a free-will offering will be taken for the monastery. A reception will follow the performance. Hutmacher is the founder and director of Chiesa Nuova, a Franciscan center for the support and encouragement of the arts in Chicago. He has given concerts throughout the United States, Germany and Italy. For the Billings concert, he will be accompanied on flute by Sister Jean Dawson of Billings. "The Poor Clare way of life is rooted in 800 years of rich history within Christianity," said Toni Spencer of Billings, who helped organize the concert. "The first Poor Clare monastery was established in 1212 in Assisi, Italy. Since then women have followed in the footsteps of St. Clare all over the world."Occupational therapists meeting in Billings More than 80 occupational therapists from Montana and Wyoming will be attending the annual Montana Occupational Therapy Association conference at the Sheraton Billings Hotel today and Saturday.

Proceeds from a silent auction will benefit Big Brothers and Sisters program of Yellowstone County and an education grant for the Montana Occupational Therapy Association. The silent auction will be from 6:30-7:30 p.m. today in the Skytop Room on the 23rd floor of the Sheraton. The public is welcome.Zoo program features real, imaginary wolves ZooMontana will hold an educational program called "The Wolf: Real or Imagined?" Saturday at 11 a.m.

Combining science and the humanities, this program will bring the audience a richer understanding of the wolf that stalks the human imagination, as well as the wolf that lives in the woods. Through illustrations with slides and video, the natural history of the wolf, as well as its role in myth and legend, will be discussed.

People also will have the opportunity for a close-up encounter with Koani, a striking, yellow-eyed "ambassador" wolf.

Wild Sentry, the Northern Rockies Ambassador Wolf Program, based in Hamilton, presents the program. Fascinating facts and fables will be explored, including why do wolves howl at the moon, do wolves really mate for life and what really happened to Little Red Riding Hood when she climbed in bed with the wolf.

Pat Tucker and Bruce Weide, of Wild Sentry, will lead the program.

There will also be several activities after the program, including a display to teach families about mountain lion safety. The Big Dig pit will also be open for people to have some fun digging up dinosaur bones.

Cost is regular zoo admission, which is $6 for adults, $3 for children ages 3-15 and $4 for seniors. For more information, contact the education department at 652-8100.Auditor talks about finances with students State Auditor John Morrison will visit Billings Skyview and Billings Senior on Monday to discuss the importance of knowledgeable saving and investing with students.

Morrison is continuing an investor education program he started last year in an effort to increase the personal finance savvy of young Montanans who will be living on their own in the next few years.

"We know all to well from our day-to-day work the high price of financial illiteracy: families who cannot send children to college, couples who are unable to purchase a home and older Americans who lose some or even all of their retirement nest eggs," Morrison said.

Morrison will visit Skyview from 8 to 10 a.m. and will be at Senior from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

For more information, contact Wendy Raney at 444-2495.Concert to benefit monastery project On Sept. 30, 1999, Poor Clare Sisters Catherine, Judith Ann, Maryalice and Jane arrived in Montana to establish a contemplative community.

Now, the sisters, who reside in Great Falls, are beginning to raise funds to build a permanent monastery.

The first step in achieving that goal is a harp and piano concert which will be presented tonight by the Rev. Robert Hutmacher, a Franciscan and a friend of the sisters. The concert will begin at 7 p.m. at St. Piux X Catholic Church, at the corner of 18th Street West and Broadwater Avenue.

The concert is free, but a free-will offering will be taken for the monastery. A reception will follow the performance.

Hutmacher is the founder and director of Chiesa Nuova, a Franciscan center for the support and encouragement of the arts in Chicago. He has given concerts throughout the United States, Germany and Italy.

For the Billings concert, he will be accompanied on flute by Sister Jean Dawson of Billings.

"The Poor Clare way of life is rooted in 800 years of rich history within Christianity," said Toni Spencer of Billings, who helped organize the concert. "The first Poor Clare monastery was established in 1212 in Assisi, Italy. Since then women have followed in the footsteps of St. Clare all over the world."

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