Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Roll call report: Thomas voting reports

Roll call report: Thomas voting reports

Sunday, March 13, 2005

WASHINGTON - Here's how area members of Congress were recorded on recent major roll call votes.

House

TRUCKER FATIGUE: Voting 198 for and 226 against, the House on March 9 refused to ease Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration rules for drivers serving oil-and-gas drilling sites on a short-haul basis. By limiting consecutive hours behind the wheel, the regulations are designed to reduce highway accidents caused by driver fatigue. But supporters of this amendment called the rules too restrictive on drivers in oil and gas fields. This occurred during debate on a highway funding bill (HR 3).

A yes vote was to ease the rules.

Voting yes: Rep. Denny Rehberg, R-Mont.; Rep. Barbara Cubin, R-Wyo.

HIGHWAYS, MASS TRANSIT: Voting 417 for and nine against, the House on March 10 passed a bill (HR 3) authorizing $284 billion over six years for highway construction, road safety and mass transit. The bill, which awaits Senate action, is funded mainly by the federal gasoline tax.

The bill provides $52 billion for mass transit, $6 billion for highway safety and $226 billion for road construction, including $12.4 billion for 4,100 projects requested by individual members.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Voting yes: Rehberg, Cubin.

HIGHWAY TOLL LANES: Voting 224 for and 201 against, the House on March 10 stripped HR 3 (above) of language requiring means-based fees for toll lanes on federally funded highways. Many states have added or are planning to add toll lanes as a way of financing improvements on congested highways.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Voting yes: Rehberg, Cubin.

Senate

MINIMUM WAGE: Voting 46 for and 49 against, the Senate on March 7 defeated a Democratic amendment to raise the minimum wage from $5.15 per hour to $7.25 per hour over 26 months. Congress last raised the minimum wage in 1997. This vote occurred during debate on a pending bankruptcy bill (S 256).

A yes vote backed the Democratic amendment.

Voting no: Sen. Conrad Burns, R-Mont.; Sen. Craig Thomas, R-Wyo.; Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo.

Not voting: Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont.

REPUBLICAN WAGE PLAN: Voting 38 for and 61 against, the Senate on March 7 defeated a Republican amendment to S 256 (above) to raise the minimum wage while reducing the number of businesses required to pay it under the 1938 Fair Labor Standards Act. The GOP plan sought to increase the base wage from $5.15 per hour to $6.25 an hour over 18 months coupled with regulatory and tax relief for businesses and a curtailment of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The New Deal statute governs wages, overtime, equal pay and other workplace conditions.

A yes vote backed the Republican amendment.

Voting yes: Burns,Thomas, Enzi.

Voting no: Baucus.

BANKRUPTCY, ABORTION PROTESTS: Voting 46 for and 53 against, the Senate on March 8 defeated an amendment to S 256 (above) to prevent individuals from using bankruptcy to avoid paying court judgments based on their violent behavior at abortion clinics and other public sites.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Voting yes: Baucus

Voting no: Burns, Thomas, Enzi.

ALIMONY, CHILD SUPPORT: Voting 41 for and 58 against, the Senate on March 10 refused to provide special protection in S 256 (above) for debtors whose financial predicament results from their failure to receive alimony and/or child support.

The amendment sought to exempt such debtors from the means testing in the bill that determines whether one has to repay debt under Chapter 13 of the bankruptcy code.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Voting yes: Baucus.

Voting no: Burns, Thomas, Enzi.

BANKRUPTCY OVERHAUL: Voting 74 for and 25 against, the Senate on March 10 sent the House a bill (S 256) making it difficult for individuals with means to use bankruptcy to walk away from their unsecured debt. Backers said the bill would curb widespread abuses of the bankruptcy code by credit-card borrowers, while foes called it a giveaway to the lending industry.

Under the bill, most debtors making more than the median income for their state are required to file under Chapter 13 of the bankruptcy code, which entails substantial payment of unsecured debt, rather than Chapter 7, which requires little or no repayment.

The bill allows high-end filers to continue using special trusts to shield assets and places no federal limit on the value of homes that can be shielded.

The bill also changes certain bankruptcy rules for farms and businesses.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Voting yes: Baucus, Burns, Thomas, Enzi.

CREDIT-CARD FEES: Voting 38 for and 61 against, the Senate on March 10 refused to prevent credit-card issuers from charging late-payment fees and accrued interest to consumers who enter credit counseling and adopt a debt-management plan. The underlying bill (S 256, above) requires individuals to receive credit instruction as a condition of filing for bankruptcy.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Voting no: Baucus, Burns, Thomas, Enzi.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST: Voting 44 for and 55 against, the Senate on March 10 refused to retain a ban now in law to keep investment banks that underwrite a company's securities from getting involved in the same company's bankruptcy proceedings.

The 67-year-old ban is designed to prevent a firm that helped cause a bankruptcy from profiting from it.

As later passed, S 256 (above) allows involvement by investment banks both before and after the bankruptcy of a client company.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Voting no: Baucus, Burns, Thomas, Enzi.

DISABLED VETERANS: Voting 99 for and none against, the Senate on March 10 granted protection in S 256 (above) to disabled veterans whose financial problems developed mainly during their military service.

The amendment exempts such debtors from the bill's means test to determine whether filers must pay off at least some of their debt.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Voting yes: Baucus, Burns, Thomas, Enzi.

0
0
0
0
0

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News