{{featured_button_text}}
U.S. Congressman Steve Daines (copy)

U.S. Congressman Steve Daines 

HELENA – U.S. Rep. Steve Daines, R-Mont., took scores of votes during his first year in Congress, but where did he stand on the key votes during the 2013 Congress?

Here’s a look at 13 key votes, as identified by the non-partisan publication Congressional Quarterly, and how Daines voted:

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
Keep reading for FREE!
Enjoy more articles by signing up or logging in. No credit card required.
  • Super-storm Sandy relief: In January 2013, the House voted 241-180 to pass a $50.5 billion relief bill for Northeastern states damaged by Super-storm Sandy. The bill passed the Senate and was signed by President Barack Obama. Daines voted “no.“
  • No budget, no pay resolution: The same month, the House voted 285-144 to pass a bill to block the pay of members of Congress if they didn’t pass a budget by April 2013. It became law. Daines voted “yes.”
  • Violence Against Women Act: In February 2013, the House voted 286-138 to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, which assists programs to help victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. It became law. Daines voted “yes.”
  • n 2013 budget resolution: Last March, the House voted 318-109 to agree with the Senate on a resolution setting 2013 spending for the federal government, funding most agencies at 2012 levels. Obama signed the deal. Daines voted “yes.“
  • Federal Aviation Administration funding: On April 26, the House voted 361-41 to suspend its rules to allow the FAA to transfer $253 million to avoid furloughing air-traffic controllers and other employees, during a congressional dispute over the FAA budget. Daines voted “yes.”
  • Immigration enforcement: On June 6, the House voted 224-201 to block funding that would implement several new immigration policies, including one to providing leniency for illegal immigrants who came to the United States as children. Obama opposed the move. Daines voted “yes.”
  • Abortion ban: On June 18, the House voted 228-196 for a bill creating a nationwide ban on abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, except when the woman’s life is in danger, or the pregnancy is the result of incest or rape, if the incident is reported to law enforcement. It died in the Senate. Daines voted “yes.”
  • Farm bill: On June 20, the House rejected the farm bill, 195-234, that revised many agriculture programs and cut back on food stamp benefits. Obama opposed the measure, primarily because of the level of food-stamp cuts. Daines voted “yes.” A compromise farm bill finally passed in January; Daines supported it.
  • Phone-record collections: On July 24, on a 205-217 vote, the House rejected an amendment that would have blocked funding that executes orders to collect telephone and other records, unless those orders are limited to “tangible things” pertaining to the person being investigated. Obama opposed the amendment. Daines voted “yes.”
  • Iran sanctions: On July 31, the House voted 400-20 to suspend its rules to pass a bill imposing increased economic sanctions on Iran and expanding existing sanctions related to human rights and terrorism. Obama opposed the bill, which died in the Senate. Daines voted “yes.”
  • Ending government shutdown: On Oct. 16, the House voted 285-144 to accept a Senate-passed budget resolution that ended the 16-day federal government shutdown, which began when House Republicans refused to pass a budget unless the president agreed to amend the Affordable Care Act. Daines voted “yes.”
  • Health-insurance policy extension: On Nov. 15, the House voted 261-157 for a bill allowing health insurers to continue offering policies that don’t comply with the Affordable Care Act, in the wake of insurance company cancellation of these policies. The bill died in the Senate. Daines voted “yes.”
  • n Fiscal 2014 budget deal: On Dec. 12, the House voted 332-94 to accept a bipartisan budget deal setting spending levels for 2014 and 2015. Daines voted “no.”

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0