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Tetons

Following rescues in Grand Teton National Park recently the Park Service is reminding outdoor adventurers to be prepared and know their limitations.

Even though the summer is winding down, it’s worth remembering that hiking can involve a bit of risk.

That was driven home when Grand Teton National Park rangers recently had to help out hikers and climbers in the rugged Wyoming mountains.

“Hikers and climbers attempting larger ascents are reminded to research their route and be knowledgeable of the skills required for their trip,” the park wrote in a press release. “It is imperative that hikers understand their own skills in order to prevent emergency situations for themselves and responders.”

In one rescue on Aug. 9, a 28 year-old woman from Mongolia who was working in the area slipped on snow in the South Fork of Garnet Canyon and fell approximately 50 to 100 feet on snow and rocks and was injured. Luckily another hiking party in the area was able to call for help using an emergency backcountry application on their cell phone to request assistance.

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Nergui Enkhchineg was located by the Teton Interagency Helicopter, allowing for quick medical treatment and evacuation.

Two days later a visitor with a medical emergency at a backcountry campsite on Leigh Lake was transported out of the park on a wheeled litter.

“As good weather and conditions draw hikers and climbers into the backcountry it is important to be prepared,” the Park Service noted. “Hikers and climbers should set a reasonable objective within the skills and experiences of the group. Consulting topographic maps, guidebooks, and park rangers will help parties gauge difficulty and skill level of the route before ascending. Desire to reach the summit during dangerous conditions is a hazard. Hikers should be prepared to alter their route if they do not feel confident about their skill level or if conditions worsen.”

These tips are also a good reminder for hunters as we move into the fall upland bird and archery seasons.

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