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The 10-way race for Big Horn County sheriff is down to two candidates for the general election.

With votes from all 20 precincts tallied, the election is now a race between longtime residents and current deputies Pete Big Hair and Debbie Uffelman Winburn.

Unofficial results had big Big Hair with 726 votes; Winburn, 480; Gary Liming, 268; Will Falls Down, 261; Bob Pease, 216; Mark Sargent, 196; Pete Molina, 166; Ed Eastman, 159; Joe Caton, 94; and Ron Reece, 93.

In other Big Horn election results, voters rejected a ballot item to repeal the consolidated law enforcement services between the county and city of Hardin. The vote failed with 1,019 votes for and 1,265 against ending consolidation.

Winburn grew up in St. Xavier and credited her early lead to knowing so many people in the area. She has been a Big Horn County sheriff's deputy for a year and said she ran for the office after listening to residents.

"You listen to people and their dissatisfaction with the Sheriff's Office and the frustration of working down there," she said. "And I want to make things better, not only for me, but the guys and girls that work there."

Big Hair was not available for comment on Tuesday evening.

Falls Down said he ran because in his 26-year law enforcement career. Being proactive is the best way to fight crime, he said.

"I didn't see that here, and I wasn't very pleased with it," he said. "Being proactive, basically, is getting the community involved and being out there, being seen."

Sargent, who is also from the area, said he returned to Hardin just to run for sheriff. He was chief of police in Harlem and was a Rosebud County sheriff's deputy until quitting to move to Big Horn County and run for sheriff.

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Sargent said he worked with narcotics search dogs with the Big Horn County Sheriff's Office drug task force last year and didn't like what he saw.

"I saw a department in huge disarray," he said. "It was top-heavy in administration, and there was no one on the street. Working in other well-run, efficient departments, I was disgusted in how it was ran."

Sheriff Larson T. Medicine Horse will retire when his term expires Dec. 31.

He has served four terms as sheriff and was a deputy for four years before that.

Medicine Horse said he did not back a candidate during the primary and was waiting to see which candidates were forwarded to the general election.

"I thought I'd give everybody a chance," he said.

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