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Bison bones

Tons of bison bones representing more than 2,000 animals were uncovered as archaeologists worked to study the 2,000-year-old Sarpy Bison Kill site before coal mining begins.

A federal judge on Tuesday pushed back the trial for the four remaining defendants in a corruption case on Montana's Crow Indian Reservation.

U.S. District Judge Sam Haddon canceled a planned June 10 start date for the trial and reset it for August 13.

Attorneys for the defendants said they need more time to prepare their case because they've had trouble locating dozens of witnesses on the reservation whom they want to interview.

The case already had been canceled once for the same reason, and Haddon indicated no further delays will be allowed.

Authorities say that while doing work for the Crow Tribal Historic Preservation Office, the defendants took money intended to cover the cost of monitoring historic sites. That included a bison kill site later severely damaged as part of a coal mining project.

Under former preservation office director Dale Old Horn, authorities said companies were told to pay monitors directly instead of paying the Crow Tribe as should have been required. Some of the monitors were paid a second time as tribal employees.

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Three other defendants pleaded guilty and were sentenced May 1 to probation and restitution.

Old Horn and the other remaining defendants — Martin Lloyd Old Horn, Allen Joseph Old Horn and Shawn Talking Eagle Danforth — have pleaded not guilty to charges including fraud, conspiracy and extortion.

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