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A former Crow tribal official accused of lying about financial and business information to the Department of Justice pleaded not guilty Thursday in federal court.

Theodore J. Hogan, 61, of Sedona, Ariz., was indicted on three counts of false statements. If convicted, Hogan faces five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

The indictment alleges that on three occasions since 2001, Hogan knowingly gave false information to the Department of Justice in financial statements called "financial statement of debtor," which is a form required from persons owing restitution, and in a response to a series of questions from the agency.

According to the indictment, Hogan failed in May 2001 to disclose his ownership interest in Ted Hogan and Associates LLC, failed to disclose all financial institutions where he had a bank account and failed to disclose all creditors to whom he owed money. In October 2003, Hogan is accused of not disclosing his ownership interest in several bank accounts and their balances, his ownership interest and employment in his company and failed to disclose cash gifts he made that exceeded $500.

And in March 2005, the indictment says, Hogan failed to disclose his ownership interest in Raven Resource Development Co., the financial institutions where he had a bank account and cash gifts and loans he made that exceeded $500.

The case is being prosecuted by Robert Mandel, with the U.S. Attorney's Office in Rapid City, S.D. The Montana U.S. Attorney's Office recused itself from the case.

Hogan was Crow tribal secretary in the 1970s and 1980s. In the 1990s he was convicted in a corruption scandal while serving as executive director of the Crow Tribal Housing Authority. He was sentenced to two years in prison and was ordered to pay $35,100 restitution. Hogan had been making restitution payments of several hundred dollars a month for years before he completed restitution in February this year with an $18,550 payment.

In recent years, Hogan and his Sedona-based company, Ted Hogan and Associates, have been seeking investors for minerals development on the Crow Reservation. Those activities have generated complaints to federal and tribal officials from investors. The investors claim they have lost hundreds of thousands in a deal in which Hogan said he was the tribe's exclusive agent and promised big returns.

Hogan earlier this year sued investor Elaine Roulidis, of Springfield, Va., in Virginia for $361 million, claiming she defamed him to hurt his business. Roulidis countersued Hogan for $350,000, saying Hogan defrauded her of $66,000. She claims Hogan has defrauded other investors of more than $1 million.

U.S. Magistrate Richard Anderson released Hogan without bond until trial. The case will be heard by Senior U.S. District Judge Jack Shanstrom.

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