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The man who was caught by Best Buy’s “Geek Squad” with child pornography on his computer was sentenced to prison Friday morning.

Natrona County District Judge Catherine Wilking sentenced Andrew Hibschweiler to three to five years in prison, but allowed for a boot camp recommendation.

According to Hibschweiler’s affidavit, a police search warrant revealed 22 videos and three photographs depicting child pornography on the now-21-year-old’s computer. The device was flagged by a Geek Squad employee after Hibschweiler brought it in to remove viruses.

At a previous hearing, the state agreed to cap its sentencing arguments at three to five years with a boot camp recommendation in exchange for a guilty plea. Hibschweiler’s attorney was free to argue for anything less than that, which he did Friday morning.

Defense attorney Don Fuller contended that the case deserved a probation term rather than a prison sentence. Fuller said his client exhibited a great deal of remorse over the crime and stressed his spotless criminal record. He added that Hibschweiler did not distribute the images or videos — an auxiliary crime that often accompanies charges of child porn possession.

“I’m not trying to minimize the crime, but it’s not the depth that we usually see,” Fuller said.

The defense attorney said he had no issue with the prosecutors’ prescribed top and bottom numbers, but asked for a suspended three- to five-year sentence with three years of supervised probation.

Assistant District Attorney Dan Itzen argued for the maximum term allowed by the plea agreement. He maintained that Hibschweiler’s clean record did not excuse him from the crimes he was convicted of and noted that the single charge of child porn possession did not signify a single crime.

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“What is striking is the repeated nature of the defendant’s conduct,” he said.

Fuller read a statement prepared by Hibschweiler, in which the defendant apologized to his family and called his actions “inexcusable.”

“You will see that I can do good,” the former Marine wrote. “I can be a better citizen and will be a better citizen.”

Wilking agreed with the state’s proposed sentence, and noted that the only reason she agreed to the boot camp recommendation was because of Hibschweiler’s lack of criminal history and his youth. A boot camp recommendation affords Hibschweiler the opportunity to have his case brought before the court upon the successful completion of the program.

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