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Casper City Council recount

Andrew Burnes, IT project manager with Natrona County, runs ballots during a recount for the Casper City Council Ward I race between Keith Goodenough and Tim Stirrett on Thursday in Casper, Wyo. Goodenough and Stirrett both gained one vote, leaving Goodenough with the same 11-vote margin of victory.

CASPER, Wyo. — Incumbent Keith Goodenough has won re-election to the Ward 1 seat on the Casper City Council, according to a recount conducted Thursday morning.

Both Goodenough and challenger Tim Stirrett gained a single vote in the recount, meaning the former state legislator won by a margin of 11 votes, according to Natrona County Clerk Renea Vitto.

The results mean all three City Council incumbents — Goodenough, Vice Mayor Paul Bertoglio and Kenyne Schlager, both of Ward 3 — won re-election. The only new council member will be Paul Meyer, who bested Nichole Collier for the Ward 2 vacancy created by Glenn Januska's retirement.

The final tally was Goodenough with 2,283 votes to Stirrett's 2,272 votes, or about 49.9 percent to 49.6 percent. Twenty write-in votes in the race were also tabulated.

While City Council races are officially nonpartisan, Goodenough attributed the tight race to the fact that he is well-known as a Democrat.

“When I was a Democrat (in the state Legislature), I espoused cutting-edge ideas for Wyoming, and I believe that's earned me a permanent spot on peoples' lists,” he said.

Such ideas include allowing medical marijuana and physician-assisted suicide in the state, Goodenough said.

“That's another one to send people into orbit,” he said, referring to the suicide legislation.

Many of Goodenough's other races have also ended closely. He has won elections by 72 and 91 votes, and lost by 36 and 122 votes, he said.

“That's kind of nature of my candidacy, to some degree,” Goodenough said.

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Stirrett said he had learned a lot in the process of running for council and plans to stay involved in community issues, including, possibly, another political run.

“I'm more sure about the possibility of me running again for something in the future,” he said.

Goodenough, first elected to the council in 2006 after defeating then-Mayor Renee Burgess, considers himself a strong proponent of property rights.

A skeptic of government's ability to steer or control development, he is an opponent of the city's Old Yellowstone District improvement area.

Stirrett, a teacher, advocated for more mixed-used development downtown and has said he would try to shrink city costs by making the city's golf courses more efficient.

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