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CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Two Republican legislative candidates who lost their primary election races aren't giving up and will take the more difficult write-in road to get their names on the general election ballot.

Bob Berry of Cody will campaign to get people to write in his name on the Nov. 6 ballot for Senate District 18 against incumbent Sen. Hank Coe of Cody.

Chris Sorge of Douglas is pumped up to get his name on the general election ballot for House District 6 against incumbent Rep. Richard Cannaday of Glenrock.

Berry, a Tea Party organizer, lost the Republican primary election on Aug. 21 to Coe by 117 votes (2,149 to 2,032).

He said the write-in effort will be tough because it never has succeeded before by a candidate who lost the primary.

After the final primary votes came in, Berry said he was comfortable with the narrow loss but his supporters wanted him to keep going.

"I truly believe, and I do this as the work of the people," Berry said Thursday.

It also is the work "of the holy spirit and God," he added.

Berry said he will work hard to get write-in votes and believes people need to stand up and buck the system like former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin did.

Coe said Thursday that he takes Berry's write-in challenge seriously.

"These people are really organized and wrapped up in their agenda," Coe said.

He also pointed out there will be nearly 3,000 Democrats who didn't vote in the primary because they had no candidates on the ballot. They will be voting in the general election, although not all will vote for him, he said.

Also, the general ballot will feature races for mayor and other offices that occupy the voters who will be reluctant to take the time to do a write-in vote, Coe said.

"I think the big issue with me was I've been there a long time," Coe said of his slim primary victory. "I don't think it was the social issues.

"Clearly this will be my last term."

Coe has served nearly 24 years in the state Senate.

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Sorge lost the primary election to Cannaday by 542 votes (1,163 to 621).

Sorge, who turned 21 in May, said if he can pick up more than 270 additional write-in votes, perhaps from people who didn't vote in the primary, he can win the House seat.

He said his campaign is better financed this time and he and his supporters will knock on more doors.

Endorsements from Wyoming Right to Life and Wyoming Family Coalition also helped him decide to run as a write-in candidate.

Sorge said he didn't know about those endorsements until the primary was over.

Cannaday, a 77-year-old Glenrock businessman, served four years in the state House. He said he isn't too worried about the challenge but will take it one step at a time.

"Write-ins don't do well," he said. "People don't like to take the time to write in someone's name on the ballot."

"They have to have a reason," Cannaday added.

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