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Wyoming Smog
A ground-level flare roars at a well site in western Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin, where ozone levels in February and March exceeded the worst days in major U.S. cities last year. Local residents complain of runny eyes, nosebleeds and shortness of breath and say the air is hazy. Gas industry officials say they're taking steps to reduce air pollution. (AP Photo/Mead Gruver)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Warmer weather and melting snow have ended the ozone problem in western Wyoming's gas fields for now.

It was a bad season: Ozone levels exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limit on 13 days in February and March. Preliminary data show ozone levels topped the worst readings in many large U.S. cities all last year.

The Upper Green River Basin is one of the nation's top gas-producing areas. Gas producers say they've taken steps to reduce the air pollution that causes wintertime ozone under conditions that include bright sunshine and snow on the ground.

Even so, some people blamed ozone for giving them itchy eyes, shortness of breath and nosebleeds. Ozone also is associated with smog.

State regulators and industry officials say they're working together to try to reduce ozone.

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