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BOSTON (AP) – The family of the man who confessed to being the Boston Strangler and the family of one of his alleged victims said Wednesday they will subpoena DNA evidence in the decades-old case because they believe investigators are no longer pursuing it.

Attorney General Thomas Reilly has refused to share evidence with the families of Albert DeSalvo and Mary Sullivan, believed to be the last of the strangler’s 13 victims.

Neither family believes DeSalvo was the strangler and they have started a private investigation to prove it. They exhumed Sullivan’s body earlier this year in search of new DNA evidence.

Attorney Dan Sharp said subpoenas would be served Thursday on both the attorney general and Boston police, demanding that officials turn over DNA samples taken from Sullivan’s body and other evidence.

Neither Reilly nor a police spokeswoman immediately returned calls Wednesday.

DeSalvo is blamed for the string of murders that spread fear throughout the city between 1962 and 1964.

He claimed to be the strangler while he was serving a life sentence for unrelated crimes. He was never charged in the strangler murders and recanted his confession before he was stabbed to death in prison in 1973.

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