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BONN, Germany (AP) – Oskar Schindler’s widow said Tuesday that Israel should return to Germany his documents, including a list of some 1,200 Jewish prisoners he is credited with saving from the Nazis.

Emilie Schindler, 94, spoke at a modern history museum in Bonn, which she maintained would be the best place for the documents.

“It is my wish and will that these documents, with the list of names of the rescued Jews, return to Germany soon,” she said.

Oskar Schindler saved Jews by drawing up lists with fictitious jobs in his factory in occupied Poland to convince the Nazi SS the workers were vital to the war effort. His efforts were chronicled in the movie “Schindler’s List.”

Schindler’s widow, who now lives in a home for the elderly in Argentina, has claimed she was Schindler’s sole heir, even though they had not lived together in their later years.

The documents were found by a German couple in 1999 in a trunk and given to the Stuttgarter Zeitung newspaper, which published excerpts and donated them and photographs to Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial.

Last month, a Stuttgart court ordered the newspaper to pay Emilie Schindler $11,000 for publishing the documents.

Schindler and his wife emigrated to Argentina in 1949, but he left her behind in 1958 and returned to Germany, where he died in 1974. He was buried in Jerusalem at his own request.

The widow on Tuesday handed over other documents, including excerpts from the diary of one of the Jews her husband saved.

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