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Thursday, May 8, 2003

Saudi Arabia says terror plot was foiled RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — Saudi authorities have foiled plans by suspected terrorists to carry out attacks in the kingdom and seized a large cache of weapons and explosives, the Interior Ministry said Wednesday.

Security forces seized the weapons Tuesday in the capital, Riyadh, as they were searching for suspects, an unidentified ministry official said.

The official, quoted by the state-run Saudi Press Agency, said at least 19 men — 17 Saudis, an Iraqi holding Kuwaiti and Canadian citizenships and a Yemeni — were being sought.

He said others also were being sought and their identities would be announced at the appropriate time.

He said some of the men opened fire on security forces pursuing them.

The official did not disclose what the men were targeting in their terror plans.

EU falling behind in pollution goals BRUSSELS, Belgium — The European Union will fail to meet its goal of deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions unless industry takes extra steps to reduce pollution, the EU's top environment official said.

"The European Union is moving further away from meeting its commitment to achieve a substantial emissions cut," as agreed under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, EU Environment Commissioner Margot Wallstrom said Tuesday. The project requires industrialized nations to cut back heat-trapping gases.

The Kyoto Protocol is a sensitive subject internationally since President Bush pulled the United States out of the pact, saying its pollution targets would cost the U.S. economy too much.

The European Environmental Agency said 10 of the 15 EU nations are not reducing their output of such gases, notably carbon-dioxide, by as much as promised.

The total emission of greenhouse gases — which are widely seen as contributing most to global climate change — rose by 1 percent in 2001 in the EU. The Kyoto Protocol requires the EU to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 8 percent from its 1990 level in the 2008-2012 period.

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Jesus-in-India sect leader dies at 74 LONDON — Hadhrat Mirza Tahir Ahmad, the spiritual leader of a Muslim sect that believes Jesus escaped the cross and traveled to India, died April 19. He was 74.

Ahmad succeeded his father as leader of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in 1982.

The Ahmadiyyas are regarded as heretics by mainstream Islam because they believe their 19th-century founder Mirza Ghulam Ahmad was the final prophet and messiah.

The founder taught that Jesus escaped from the cross to India, resumed his ministry and was buried in Srinagar, Kashmir.

Ahmad studied in Qadian, the government college in Lahore, Pakistan, and at the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London.

He left Pakistan in 1984 because of the persecution of Ahmadiyya Muslims, and made his home in England.

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