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What’s the difference between a crisis and an emergency? Eviction from your home is a crisis. Maybe you bought a new car you couldn’t afford, or just fell behind on rent. You sit down and make tough decisions, assuming you want to keep your house. You may need to sell that car, or even take a second job. You don’t holler, “emergency!” and run out the door like the house burning down.

Our Constitution is the institution that protects our democracy. Our founding fathers, who’d had plenty of experience with kings, made sure that our closest elected representatives in Congress have the power to collect taxes and to decide how our money is spent (Article II, Sections 8.1 and 9.7). So, this question — crisis or emergency — matters, assuming we want to keep a check on presidential powers, to safeguard against extravagance and corrupt influence.

Kudos to Sen. Rand Paul for standing up for our Constitution. But if more than a third of our representatives are willing to scrap the separation of powers in the guise of securing our border, a problem that’s been building for decades, what kind of a nation are we defending? And what is its greatest threat?

If you believe we have a crisis at our border, requiring deliberate and difficult decision-making, but aren’t willing to hand our nation's purse strings to this or any future president, let your elected representatives know. This is nation is our home, and we must take care of it.

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Kristen Mark

Hardin

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