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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has met the U.N. chief and Turkey’s leader in Ukraine. Little progress was reported on expanding Ukraine’s grain exports, the volatile situation at a Russian-occupied nuclear power plant and efforts to help end the war. It was Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's first visit to Ukraine since the outbreak of the war, and the second by U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres. The leaders also discussed exchanges of prisoners of war and a proposed U.N. fact-finding mission to a prison in Russian-occupied Ukraine where 53 prisoners were killed last month.

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The world's smallest and most endangered sea turtle has hatched in Louisiana's wilds for the first known time in 75 years. Louisiana agencies say crews monitoring the Chandeleur Islands to help design a restoration project found tracks of females going to and from nests, and of hatchlings leaving nests. A news release from the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority and the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries included photos of two hatchlings crawling toward and swimming in the water. The statement says threatened loggerhead sea turtles also are nesting on the islands. It says loggerhead nests found on Grand Isle in 2015 were the first confirmed sea turtle nests in Louisiana in more than 30 years.

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Firefighters are putting out the remnants of two wildfires on a Sicilian island that forced fashion designer Giorgio Armani and dozens more to flee vacation villas overnight. The head of the region’s civil protection agency said Thursday that arson was suspected in the wildfires that forced some 30 people to seek refuge in boats or on safer parts of the island of Pantelleria. Armani's press office says he and his and guests evacuated as flames neared the Italian designer's villa but the fire stopped short of the property. Meanwhile, heat wave forecasts for Spain and Portugal could frustrate efforts to control wildfires burning in those countries.

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Algeria's civil protection agency says wildfires raging in the country's east have killed at least 37 people and wounded 161 others. Most of the victims were reported in the wilaya, or region, of El Tarf, near the northern Algeria-Tunisian border, where 34 people were found dead. The death toll included a family of five found in their home and eight people on a public bus whose driver was surprised by flames while traveling in a mountainous region. The North African nation's prime minister said Thursday that the Algerian state would support the victims’ families and pay for renovation work and compensation for the loss of livestock and beehives.

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Union Pacific has already lost three lawsuits over the way it removes employees with health conditions because of safety concerns, and the prospect of hundreds more lawsuits looms over the railroad. The lawsuits were originally going to be part of a class-action case before a federal appeals court decided the cases must be pursued individually. The first few lawsuits have now been tried with verdicts over $1 million coming in all three cases, but more than 200 more discrimination complaints are still pending with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that are likely to turn into lawsuits. Union Pacific has vigorously defended its policy in court, and the railroad says it is designed to protect its workers and the public from significant injury risks.

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The coroner's office says actor Anne Heche died from burns and inhalation injury after her fiery car crash and the death has been ruled an accident. The cause of her death was released on the Los Angeles County coroner's website Wednesday, although a formal autopsy report is still being completed. Heche was 53 when her car plowed into a Los Angeles home on Aug. 5 and caught fire. Her family has said she suffered a severe brain injury caused by lack of oxygen. The coroner's office says she died Aug. 11, but she was removed from life support on Sunday so that her organs could be donated.

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A fire consumed a building at the site of the long-closed Grossinger’s resort, once among the most storied and glamorous hotels in New York’s Catskills. The fire broke out Tuesday evening in a three-and-half story building on the old hotel property. The cause was under investigation. In its heyday after World War II, Grossinger’s drew hundreds of thousands of vacationers a year, most of them Jewish. The resort had a 27-hole golf course, indoor and outdoor pools, a nightclub, two kosher kitchens and a 1,500-seat dining room. It has been cited as an inspiration for the 1987 movie “Dirty Dancing.”

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People in Arizona and Nevada won’t face bans on watering their lawns or washing their cars despite more Colorado River water shortages. Officials said Tuesday there will be less water available next year from the river that serves 40 million people in the West and Mexico and observers say a reckoning is still coming for the growing region. New cuts will build on last year’s reductions. They all but eliminated some central Arizona farmers’ Colorado River water supply and reduced the water share for Nevada and Mexico to a much lower extent.

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Brad Pitt’s Make It Right Foundation and homeowners of the houses built by the program, in an area of New Orleans hit hard by Hurricane Katrina have reached a more than $20 million settlement. The settlement reached Tuesday represents a milestone in the long-running saga that began in the aftermath of the 2005 hurricane. In 2007, Pitt founded the futuristic housing development organization with a goal of replacing lost housing in the flood-ruined Lower Ninth Ward. The project was praised initially, but 10 years and more than $26 million later, construction was halted.  Residents reported sagging porches, mildewing wood and leaky roofs.

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A northwest Iowa woman has died after being attacked by her five Great Danes. The Clay County Sheriff's Office on Wednesday said a man found a woman in a ditch in a rural area of Clay County on Monday but couldn’t get close to her because of several large dogs. KTIV-TV reports the man reported what he found and deputies determined the woman was dead. She was identified as 43-year-old Mindy Kiepe, of Rossie. The state medical examiner said Wednesday that Kiepe died of multiple dog bites. An investigation determined Kiepe’s Great Danes caused her death. Kiepe lived at a farm near where her body was found. The sheriff’s office said the dogs were euthanized.

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Former Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill is dismissing as “old news” the question of whether allegations that he drunkenly groped four women during a 2018 party could hurt his chances of replacing Republican U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski following her death in a highway crash. Hill is the most prominent of the dozen candidates who met Wednesday’s deadline to enter the Republican caucus to pick Walorski’s replacement on the November election ballot in northern Indiana’s solidly GOP 2nd Congressional District. Hill denied wrongdoing but the state Supreme Court ordered a 30-day suspension of his law license. Hill tells WISH-TV that the allegations are old news and that the district needs “somebody who’s a fighter.”

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A Georgia man has been indicted on homicide charges after a Memorial Day weekend boat crash that killed five people. Mark Stegall faces 10 counts of first-degree homicide by vessel, six counts of serious injury by vessel, boating under the influence, and reckless operation. Wednesday's indictment came after a boat Stegall was driving hit another boat, killing four family members on that boat and one on Stegall's boat. Authorities say Stegall was under the influence of alcohol and operating the boat recklessly by steering it down the wrong side of the river. It’s unclear if Stegall has a lawyer who could speak for him.

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A spate of explosions and fires has turned Russian-occupied Crimea from a secure rear base into a new battleground in the war, demonstrating both the Russians’ vulnerability and the Ukrainians’ capacity to strike deep behind enemy lines. Nine Russian warplanes were reported destroyed at an air base in Crimea last week, and an ammunition depot on the peninsula blew up Tuesday. Ukrainian authorities have stopped short of publicly claiming responsibility, but President Volodymyr Zelenskyy alluded to Ukrainian attacks behind enemy lines after the latest blasts, which Russia blamed on “sabotage.” Russia seized the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine in 2014 and has used it to stage attack on the country in the war that began Feb. 24.

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A hermit who was evicted from New Hampshire property on which he had lived for nearly three decades has found a new home in Maine. Eighty-two-year-old David Lidstone has put in windows and is working on installing a chimney on his rustic three-room cabin. He said it is on land he bought. Lidstone grew up in Maine but declined to say where he was living or provide a contact for the landowner. A family member confirmed he has moved there. He had returned to live on the New Hampshire property but faced a $500-a-day fine if he didn't leave.

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Factories in China's southwest have shut down and a city imposed rolling blackouts after reservoirs to generate hydropower ran low in a worsening drought. That adds to economic strains at a time when President Xi Jinping is preparing to try to extend his hold on power. Companies in Sichuan including makers of solar panels and cement were closed or reduced production after they were ordered to ration power. The power company in Dazhou, a city of 3.4 million people, imposed rolling power cuts of three hours. The shutdowns add to challenges for the ruling Communist Party after economic recovery weakened in July.

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A wave of arson and bombing attacks overnight hit Thailand’s southernmost provinces, which for almost two decades have been the scene of an active Muslim separatist insurgency. A military spokesman said Wednesday at least 17 attacks occurred in Pattani, Narathiwat and Yala provinces, mostly at convenience stores and gas stations. Three civilians were reported injured. There have been no claims of responsibility. More than 7,300 people have been killed since the insurgency began in 2004 in the three provinces, the only ones with Muslim majorities in Buddhist-dominated Thailand. Attacks have also taken place in neighboring Songkhla province.

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Explosions and fires have ripped through an ammunition depot in Russia-annexed Crimea in the second suspected Ukrainian attack on the peninsula in just over a week. The blasts forced the evacuation of more than 3,000 people. Russia is blaming the explosions on an “act of sabotage” without naming the perpetrators. Ukraine stopped short of publicly claiming responsibility. Last week's explosions destroyed nine Russian planes at another Crimean air base. Russia seized Crimea from Ukraine in 2014 and has used it to launch attacks against the country in the war that began nearly six months ago. If Ukrainian forces were, in fact, behind the explosions, they would represent a significant escalation in the war.

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For the second year in a row, Arizona and Nevada will face cuts in the amount of water they can draw from the Colorado River as the West endures more drought. Federal officials made the announcement Tuesday. The cuts planned for next year will force states to make critical decisions about where to reduce consumption and whether to prioritize growing cities or agricultural areas. Mexico will also face cuts. But the seven states that rely on the river could soon face even deeper cuts that the government has said are needed to prevent reservoirs from falling so low they cannot be pumped.

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Two brothers from Mexico are facing federal charges after fleeing from U.S. authorities in July and crashing their vehicle, killing two and injuring 10 others just miles from the international border. Federal prosecutors announced Tuesday that 21-year-old Jorge Garcia-Rascon and 19-year-old Julio Garcia-Rascon have been charged with conspiracy to smuggle immigrants resulting in death. They will remain in custody pending trial. Their lawyer did not immediately return a message seeking comment. Court documents state the brothers had been smuggled themselves and one of them was transporting other migrants to pay off his debt for being brought to the United States.

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Federal investigators say a man who jumped to his death from a small airplane in North Carolina appeared to be upset over damaging the landing gear during a failed runaway approach. The National Transportation Safety Board released its preliminary report on the crash Tuesday. The plane’s pilot in command told federal investigators that his copilot “became visibly upset about the hard landing” after they diverted to another airport. The report said the copilot lowered the ramp in the back of the airplane. He then “removed his headset, apologized and departed the airplane via the aft ramp door.” The incident occurred July 29 about 30 miles south of Raleigh-Durham International Airport. Charles Hew Crooks did not have a parachute.

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A Palestinian human rights group and an Israeli newspaper are reporting that an explosion in a cemetery that killed five Palestinian children during the latest Gaza flare-up was caused by an Israeli airstrike. It was one of a number of blasts during the fighting that did not bear the telltale signs of an Israeli F-16 or drone strike, and which the Israeli military said might have been caused by rocket misfires by Palestinian militants. The five children, aged 4 to 16 years old, had gathered in the local cemetery, one of the few open spaces in the crowded Jebaliya refugee camp. They were killed hours before a cease-fire ended the fighting.

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Authorities say a small plane that plunged into a lake that straddles the Arizona-Utah state line, killing two people and injuring five, was carrying six French tourists plus a pilot. Kane County Sheriff’s officials in Utah say witnesses reported seeing the plane out of Page crash into Lake Powell near Face Canyon shortly before 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Federal Aviation Administration officials said in a statement that the pilot of the single-engine Cessna 207 reported an engine problem before the plane went down. The aircraft was located in 120 feet of water and Kane County authorities say two people died in the submerged aircraft. Utah Department of Public Safety divers were trying to recover the bodies. The names of the dead and injured haven’t been released yet.

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The National Weather Service forecasts more thunderstorms for much of West Virginia, including areas that flooded Monday. Storms were expected to develop Tuesday and Wednesday, but a flood watch was no longer in effect. West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice declared a state of emergency in two southern counties where people had to be rescued by water as the floods damaged more than 100 homes, bridges and roads. Smithers Mayor Anne Cavalier told WCHS radio that a lot of homes got water in their first floors and basements and that she saw cars floating down a creek.

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Police in Germany says one person has died and nine were seriously injured after a test car with autonomous steering capability veered into oncoming traffic. A spokesman for police in the southwestern town of Reutlingen said Tuesday that the electric BMW iX with five people on board swerved out of its lane at a bend in the road. It triggered a series of collisions involving four vehicles Monday afternoon. Police said they hadn’t yet had an opportunity to interview those involved in the crash and it was unclear if the 43-year-old driver had been steering the vehicle at the time. BMW confirmed that one of its test vehicles was involved in the collision. But the company denied that the vehicle was fully autonomous.

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Germany’s main industry lobby group has warned that factories may have to throttle production or halt it completely because plunging water levels on the Rhine are making it harder to transport cargo on the river. Water levels on the Rhine at Emmerich near the Dutch border hit a record low Tuesday morning. It highlights the extreme lack of water caused by months of drought affecting much of Europe. The deputy head of the business lobby group BDI said that “the ongoing drought and the low water levels threaten the supply security of industry.” He warned that energy supplies could also be further strained as ships carrying coal and gasoline along the Rhine are affected.

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