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FICTION: Colson Whitehead's enthralling, evocative new novel transforms a petty heist into a resonant exploration of race and class. "Harlem Shuffle" by Colson Whitehead; Doubleday (336 pages, $28.95) ——— Colson Whitehead is perhaps our most protean novelist, shape-shifting with each book, a jack of all trades and master of all. His enthralling, cinematic new work, "Harlem Shuffle," capers ...

FICTION: A Pulitzer Prize winner returns with a robust if uneven novel that encapsulates the American Century. "Late City" by Robert Olen Butler; Atlantic Monthly Press (290 pages, $27) ——— We know this man: From George Bailey in "It's a Wonderful Life" to the ailing documentarian in Russell Banks' "Foregone," he flashes back over the arc of his life when staring down the barrel of mortality. ...

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"The Last Wilderness" by Murray Morgan; University of Washington Press (272 pages, $22.95, available mid-June) ___ What a surprise and delight "The Last Wilderness," by the late journalist and author Murray Morgan, is. Originally published in 1955, it has been reissued by the University of Washington Press with a fresh design and a new introduction by poet Tim McNulty, another authentic and ...

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"Roar" by Cecelia Ahern; Grand Central (273 pages, $26) ___ Irish novelist Cecelia Ahern offers bedtime stories for feminists in "Roar," each featuring a protagonist referred to as "the woman." The 30 allegorical tales, with such titles as "The Woman Who Slowly Disappeared" and "The Woman Who Unraveled," offer inspiration in dealing with such travails as getting older in a sexist, ageist ...

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"Mostly Dead Things" by Kristen Arnett; Tin House (354 pages, $24.95) ___ The Mortons are just a typical Florida family, a mom and dad and son and daughter and a couple of grandkids, living somewhere near Orlando. The family business is taxidermy. In a shop teeming with skillfully mounted critters of every kind, Dad teaches his craft to daughter Jessa: "Our heart," she says, "was in the curve ...

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"The Sentence Is Death" by: Anthony Horowitz; Harper (373 pages, $27.99) ___ Anthony Horowitz (a fictional character and the narrator of this book) is on the set of "Foyle's War," the World War II-era TV show that Anthony Horowitz (a real person and the author of this book) wrote for the BBC. When Honeysuckle Weeks (a character in this novel but also an actress on the show) steps off a bus ...

"Howard Stern Comes Again" by Howard Stern; Simon & Schuster (549 pages, $35) ___ "Howard Stern Comes Again" is proof that radio's bad boy has finally reached adulthood. The King of All Media rose to the top of his field by triggering fights, recruiting unstable regulars and poking at guests. But this collection of celebrity interviews, most of which were conducted on his satellite radio show ...

"Code Blue" by Mike Magee; Atlantic Monthly Press (368 pages, $27) ___ Although an opioid-abuse epidemic was raging, doctors who had access to the addictive drugs were brazenly selling them to addicts with no pretense of medical treatment, including one case in which a Memphis physician was doling out thousands of scripts in exchange for cash. One "patient" crossed state lines and got 10 ...

"Strange Cures" by Rob Zabrecky; Rothco Press; 348 pages, $19.95 ___ In musician and magician Rob Zabrecky's new memoir, "Strange Cures," the Los Angeles of the 1980s and early '90s is an alien landscape of raucous underground nightclubs, seedy Hollywood crack dens and low-rent Silver Lake duplexes; and the Valley is a place where errant teens roam free, sans supervision and GPS-tracking ...

"No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us" by Rachel Louise Snyder; Bloomsbury (307 pages, $28) ___ Rachel Louise Snyder's latest book should be required reading for lawmakers across the country as Congress debates expanding gun restrictions for domestic violence offenders in the latest Violence Against Women Act renewal. Snyder, who writes for the New Yorker, ...

"Act Natural: A Cultural History of Misadventures in Parenting" by Jennifer Traig; Ecco (352 pages, $26.99) ___ Jennifer Traig's curiosity about the history of child rearing, how kids grow up in other cultures and why modern Americans parents do what they do led her to write "Act Natural." Turns out that people have done some strange things that today seem unthinkable, but which might be fun ...

"Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century" by George Packer; Knopf (608 pages, $30) ___ The first six times I met Richard Holbrooke, I needed to introduce myself. The seventh time we met was in 1983, shortly after I had been named the Wall Street Journal's managing editor. He not only knew who I was but recalled all our prior meetings. After a mutual friend assured me it ...

"Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee" by Casey Cep; Knopf (314 pages, $26.95) ___ A series of bizarre murders that were never really solved and the beloved American novelist who never quite figured out how to write about them - it doesn't sound like the formula for a compelling book. But in the more than capable hands of journalist Casey Cep, it adds up to a most ...

"Autumn Light: Season of Fire and Farewells" by Pico Iyer; Knopf (231 pages, $25.95) ___ Thirty years ago, travel writer Pico Iyer went to Japan seeking a life of solitude, a copy of Thoreau in his suitcase. "I went to Japan to learn how to live with less hurry and fear of time," he writes, "Walden"-style. To live simply and alone. What he found was an endlessly fascinating culture perpetually ...

"The New Me" by Halle Butler; Penguin (208 pages, $16) ___ "Jillian" author Halle Butler, a Granta best young American novelist, offers a darkly comic view of contemporary life in the highly readable "The New Me," about a Chicago temp with a good education and a bad attitude. Millie has two successful, indulgent parents and no student loans. Yet she is "flailing, filled with puke, thinking ...

"Cari Mora" by Thomas Harris; Grand Central (320 pages, $29) ___ My skin was crawling by page 7. It's been 13 years since Thomas Harris last published a novel, but in "Cari Mora" the creator of Hannibal Lecter shows us he still knows how to send ice down our spines. Four of the five previous novels by Harris, a former journalist, feature Lecter, the fiendishly brilliant serial killer and ...

"Biloxi" by Mary Miller; Liveright (255 pages, $24.95) ___ Here's my advice: Don't think too much about this book - just enjoy it. "Biloxi," the third novel by Mary Miller, is an entertaining, endearing story about a late-middle-aged, morose divorced guy who accidentally acquires a dog. The dog changes his life (as dogs do). For good? For bad? For more complicated? For all those things. The ...

"The Queen" by Josh Levin; Little, Brown (417 pages, $29) ___ Sometimes a sentence makes you fall in love with a book. "The Queen" is Josh Levin's nonfiction portrait of grifter Linda Taylor, a little remembered Chicagoan who loomed large in 1970s and '80s discussions of welfare fraud. Early in the book Levin gives us this gem about Taylor's Cadillac: "That car was impossible to miss, parked ...

"The Lost Gutenberg" by Margaret Leslie Davis; TarcherPerigree (294 pages, $27) ___ Despite its misleading title, "The Lost Gutenberg" is a fascinating read for anyone who cares about books. The bibliobiography's subject is the Gutenberg Bible known as Number 45, which was published in 1456 and became the world's most expensive book when it was sold in 1987 for $5.4 million. The title could ...

"The Players Ball: A Genius, a Con Man, and the Secret History of the Internet's Rise" by David Kushner; Simon & Schuster (256 pages, $27) ___ The internet has become such a pervasive part of our lives in such a short time that it's already hard to remember its early days. For a vivid history of its Wild West phase, juiced up with a long-running battle royale between two men who made (and ...

"Lost Without the River" by Barbara Hoffbeck Scoblic; She Writes Press (271 pages, $16.95) ___ I may never be able to sort out whether I enjoyed this memoir because I also grew up on a South Dakota dairy farm, or because author Barbara Hoffbeck Scoblic has captured something universal here. We'll go with the latter, because this is, in truth, a study of family ties and geographic ties that are ...

"Queer Voices: Poetry, Prose, and Pride," edited by Andrea Jenkins, John Medeiros and Lisa Marie Brimmer; Minnesota Historical Society Press (218 pages, $18.95) ___ For 26 years, the monthly Queer Voices reading series has given Minnesota's LGBTQIA+ writers a safe space to experiment. So it's appropriate that this collection from 44 of the series' writers, almost all of whom are as identified ...

"Girl Gone Missing" by Marcie R. Rendon; Cinco Puntos Press (224 pages, $15.95) ___ Renee Blackbear is a regular at the bars and pool halls that line the streets of Fargo-Moorhead as well as the farm towns along the Red River. She chain-smokes and downs beers while hustling pool and avoiding her unchallenging college classes at Moorhead State. For extra cash, she drives a beet truck late at ...

"Pictures of Longing: Photography and the Norwegian-American Migration" by Sigrid Lien, translated by Barbara Sjoholm; University of Minnesota Press (304 pages, $29.95) ___ Descendants of Norwegian immigrants know of the albums stowed somewhere holding old family photos from those earliest days of settlement. The solemn and still faces reveal family resemblances. Their settings fill in a few ...

"The Farmer's Son: Calving Season on a Family Farm" by John Connell; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (241 pages, $25) ___ John Connell's memoir "The Farmer's Son" opens with Connell in a barn on the family farm in Ireland, both arms shoulder-deep inside of a cow. He's helped with births before, but this is the first time he's done it alone. "My father has been in charge of the calving for ...

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